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THE UNIVERSITY CLUB.

Graduate Committee Reports upon the Project.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

The Committee of Graduates appointed to report on the University Club project have prepared the following address:

At an informal meeting of Harvard men, held in Boston on December 2, the undersigned were appointed a committee to report on the plan to establish a University Club at Harvard. It is most important that the committee shall have the fullest possible expression of opinion from the present body of students and they therefore request every member of the University who is interested for or against this plan to communicate with them.

There are in Cambridge this year about 2900 students, of whom 1767 are in the Academic Department, 460 in the Law School, 340 in the Scientific School, 276 in the Graduate School, 41 in the Divinity School. So far as the committee are aware, the present social organizations embrace only undergraduates of the three upper classes of the Academic Department, and not more than 125 members of any class belong to those organizations. In other words, 2600 or 2700 men in Cambridge have no organized social connections whatever.

It has been suggested, therefore, that a University Club or Union, to which men from all classes and schools and departments should be eligible, would meet a want now felt by large numbers of students. Such an institution would require a spacious and handsome clubhouse, situated in a central spot; it would provide a reading-room, where the leading newspapers and periodicals would be on file, smoking room, a library, a billiard-room, a large hall for meetings, and a restaurant. It would naturally come to be a resort for graduates, who feel more and more the need of a meeting place to which they can go when in Cambridge; it would also serve as a proper place for putting up strangers. Furthermore, it would in nowise compete or conflict with the existing small clubs and societies maintained by the undergraduates; it would simply offer the advantages above mentioned to any member of the University who wished to pay what they would cost-say, a fee of ten dollars a year.

The committee therefore ask every one of the 2600 non-society students and of the 300 who belong to existing societies, to send to the secretary of the committee, Mr. William R. Thayer, 8 Berkeley street, Cambridge, an opinion on this subject. Every suggestion will be welcomed, and it is hoped that every man will reply at least by postal card. Such replies, if favorable, will not be regarded as pledges to join a University Club, if it be formed, but simply as indications of the opinions of those most concerned in this plan,- the students themselves. It may be added that at Cambridge, England, the Union-which costs more and offers less than the scheme above-described-had 1465 members last year-nearly fifty per cent of the University.

CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS, WILLIAM ROSCOE THAYER, HENRY E. WARNER, THOMAS C. THACHER, WILLIAM ENDICOTT, 3D, Committee.BOSTON, Dec. 14, 1895.

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