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Length of the College Course.

The table given below, taken from President Eliot's annual report, is of great interest as bearing on the question of the length of the College course. During the last few years the Faculty have had to consider a very large number of applications made to them in individual cases and the table shows to what extent students have received the degree of A. B. in other than the regular four years course. The table shows for the class graduating in each of the five years, 1890-94, (1) the number of those who received the degree of A.B. in three years from the time of admission as Freshman, or in three years after admission as Special Students or as students in the Lawrence Scientific School, in cases where transfer to a College class was allowed in view of full satisfaction of all requirements; (2) the number of those who received leave of absence for the Senior year, upon the completion of the whole or nearly the whole of the number of courses required for graduation; (3) the number of those who at the beginning of the Senior year had either completed the whole number of courses required for graduation or lacked not more than two courses, but were nevertheless registered as Seniors.

1890. 1891. 1892. 1893. 1894.

Total number receiving A. B., 282 283 293 332 348

1. Graduated in three years, 14 18 18 9 18

Of these were credited at admission, 2 or more courses each 2 4 3 3 4

Less than 2 courses, 3 4 5 1 3

2. Had leave of absence for senior year, 2 2 7 15 11

Credited with 18.2 courses, 0 0 1 6 8

17.7 courses, 0 1 0 2 3

17.2 courses, 0 1 1 1 0

16.7 courses, 0 0 1 2 0

16.2 courses, 2 0 4 4 0

Of these were credited at admission, 2 or more courses each 0 0 0 3 0

Less than 2 courses each, 0 1 0 0 2

3. Registered as Seniors, but credited with 16 courses or more, 9 13 30 24 48

Credited with 18.2 courses, 1 4 3 6 10

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