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Probable Results of International Games.

The Yale News has compared the various English and American college athletic records, so as to give some idea of the probable outcome of a meeting between Oxford and Cambridge and Harvard and Yale if it should be arranged. The records were made on different grounds and under diverse conditions and therefore an allowance must be made in comparisons. Of the English records, only those of Oxford made a year ago, are considered. The Harvard and Yale records are those of the last dual games.

At the Oxford-Yale meeting last season, there were included in the programme nine events: 100 yards run, quarter mile run, half mile run, 120 yards hurdle, putting shot, throwing hammer, running broad jump, running high jump. Both firsts and one second were taken in the 100 yards run and 120 yards hurdles by the Oxford men, C. B. Fry, W. J. Oakley and G. Gordon, while Yale's only point winner in these events was G. B. Hatch, who took a second in the hurdles.

Fry's time of 10 2/5s. was made on a heavy track and Oakley bested Hatch, the winner of the Harvard race, in 16 2/5s; but both would be obliged to run better races to win, as Richards of Yale ran close to Crum of the University of Iowa, who did the dash in 10 seconds flat, while several representatives of Yale and Harvard have cut the time for the hurdles below those figures.

At 440-yards the American representatives would all come from Harvard, being chosen from N. W. Bingham, Jr., N. B. Marshall and W. H. Vincent. Although Oxford won the event against Yale and G. Gordon, in 51s, Vincent won the intercollegiate in 50 4/5s. Considering the track, however, the Englishman's performance is rather the better.

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For 880 yards it is difficult to make a prediction. E. Hollister of Harvard won the event at both the dual and intercollegiate games, in 1 min. 58 2/5 sec. and 2 min. respectively, and W. Greenhow of Oxford took it in 2 min. 4/5 sec., with his mate, F. Rathbone, second.

The Englishmen are probably stronger in the mile. Morgan of Yale bested Coolidge of Harvard in 4 min. 37 sec., but both lost their places in the intercollegiate, which was won in 3 min. 23 2/5 sec., while W. H. Greenhow of Oxford defeated Morgan by eighty yards in 4 min. 24 2/5 sec.

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Judging by the old records, everything in the weight throwing should come to the American representatives. Hickok of Yale has a record of 44 ft. 1 1/2 in. with the sixteen-pound shot, and of 135 ft. 7 1/2 in. with the sixteen-pound hammer. Cross of Yale also has thrown the hammer 135 ft., and A. Brown of this university has put the shot over forty feet. The Oxford men last year did but little in the events, G. Robertson throwing the hammer from a 30-foot ring 101 ft., and A. F. Mailing putting the shot 35 ft. 3 3/4 in.

The records should give each side one of the jumps. Fry of Oxford holds the world's record of 23 ft. 6 1/2 in., but L. P. Sheldon of Yale defeated him with a jump of 22 ft. 10 in., and since that time has shown his ability to cover a greater distance. A. Stickney of Harvard was second in both the dual and intercollegiate events. In the high jump Paine of Harvard could get only third place in the intercollegiate with 5 ft. 10 3/4 in., but in the Yale-Harvard games a week previous he cleared the bar at 6 ft. 5/8 in.

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