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PHILLIPS BROOKS HOUSE.

A Description and Plan of the Building.- Work Begun.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

During the last week the first work towards erecting Brooks House has actually been begun and is progressing rapidly. The digging of the cellar will probably be completed today, and the stone work will be begun tomorrow.

Before his death in 1893 Bishop Brooks had promised to help the religious societies of the College in their effort to get subscriptions for a suitable religious building. After his death his classmates decided to erect a building as a memorial to him and to his unlimited interest in the religious life of Harvard. It was decided to raise $300,000 and to call the building Phillips Brooks House. The endowment was to be applied under the direction of six trustees, of whom no more than two were to belong to the same religious denomination. The trustees finally chosen were Andrew P. Peabody '26, Robert Treat Paine '55, Edwin H. Abbot '55, George H. Palmer '64, E. Winchester Donald (Amherst '69), and George A. Gordon '81.

The committee raised much less than was expected (only about $50,000) and so the original broad plans of erecting a building "dedicated to the comfort and succor of all in the college world who were in trouble, sorrow, need, sickness," had to be given up and only the chief purpose, affording a home and workshop for all forms of spiritual activity and benevolent action in the University could be realized.

On account of the small size of the building the corporation were unwilling to give it any other site than the one selected. This corner of the yard has been much objected to as a site, and the architect, Mr. A. W. Longfellow, Jr., '76, who has felt great responsibility in designing the building, has done all in his power to make it harmonize with its surroundings.

(Contined on fourth page).

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