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Special Notice.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

A BUNCH of keys found in front of Hastings Hall on March 30th, have been left at Amee's.

THE favorite comedian, Stuart Robson, who has never lacked a cordial greeting in this city, begins his engagement at the Tremont Theatre tonight. For his first week he will present the unquestionably best and most popular of his long repertoire, Bronson Howard's "The Henrietta." Volumes have been written in praise of this play, and a large part of its commendation has been bestowed upon Mr. Robson's brilliant impersonation of the role "Bertie, the Lamb." Every one will welcome back Mr. Robson, and especially in "The Henrietta." Custom does not stale this brilliant play, and it bids fair to go on in its prosperous career until the copyright expires, and it shall take its place among the masterpieces of American literature. A long stage career is the more assured because the interest does not depend upon the rendering of any particular part by a star actor. For Mr. Robson's second week here he will offer an entirely new play, an original comedy by Adrian Barbusse and Sidney Rosenfeld, entitled "Dear Old Boy," with Mr. Robson as "Marmaduc, the Good."

"TRIBY, the Fairy of Argyle" translated from the French of Charles Nodier by the well-known writer Minna Caroline Smith has just been published in a beautiful Scotch plaid by Lamson, Wolffe & Co. of Boston. This work written in 1822 has been aptly termed the grandfather of Du Maurier's "Trilby." While one might not accuse Du Maurier of plagiarism, yet his familiarity with this most beautiful tale of Nodier's is unquestioned.

The success of both has been parallel.

Nodier's "Trilby" was dramatized and popular in Paris long after the book had ceased to be. It was the first book of the great French romantic school of which Victor Hugo later became the great apostle. It was deemed immortal winning for its author the transitory "immortality" of the French academy.

But the two Trilbys differ in sex. Nodier's Tri by is the fairy, the elf, yet like the model. Singularly enough both are ruined by their love.

Nodier's Trilby is as much the fated lover as the Trilby of Du Maurier. And one reads with none the less pleasure the original Trilby, even though the new Trilby of Du Maurier seems to have won the public entire.

TUTORING in Greek, Latin, Chemistry B and German A.

M. L. BRUUER, Gr.Address 16 Gerry street. (Shall be in Harvard 3 from 7 to 10 p. m.)

36-6tDANCING CLASS. - Mrs. L. J. Chandler's dancing class, Odd Fellows Hall, Cambridgeport. Address, corner of Main and Inman streets. Private lessons.

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