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Monday was a great day in the history of this college. Long and eagerly did we await the coming of that morn which was to usher in the day of days. For on that day we were to behold the reforms which the directors of the Dining Association were to inaugurate in the mid-day meal, vulgarly known as the Monday lunch.

But, alas for the confidence which we so blindly placed in the power and wisdom of that mighty today, the Board of Directors, by whose will, dry crusts of bread can be turned into a savory pudding, and the debris of fricasseed chicken into a warm and nourishing hash. Instead of the quail on toast or tenderloin steaks for which we had starved ourselves for several days, we were regaled with a strange compound called beef pie, a cousin German of our old enemy beef stew, and the entirely novel expedient of fried mush.

In all seriousness we confess that the pie is preferable to the stew, but the question arises in our minds if something else would not be equally preferable to the pie. It is true that the "something else" will cost more. Very well, let it cost more. The hall does not pretend to furnish board less than about $4.50 per week, (vide p. 133 of catalogue), yet for the last month the board was only $3.7 per week. The Board of Directors are certainly to be congratulated in their success in running the hall at such a small cost, but is there not such a thing as running it too cheaply? It seems to us that in avoiding one extreme the management has fallen into the other. The board, especially the lunches, is altogether too poor. We believe we speak for the great majority of the boarders when we say that an advance in the price of board of from twenty-five to fifty cents would be gladly welcomed, if accompanied by an improvement in the lunchee, and by an improvement, we mean a perceptible improvement, not old things in the disguise of new names.

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