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QUIZZING THE UNDERGRADUATE.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Yesterday the members of the Senior class received a communication requesting of them their views on a very important question, namely, the value of a college training in preparation for the work of after life. The investigator who is studying this question for the Outlook has at least done more than others, who have attempted to examine the same problem, by reverting to the original courses of information to secure material for his thesis. Generally, it is no exaggeration to say, the investigators accept hearsay evidence or base their statements on the actions of a few students seen sowing their wild oats in the unfertile fields of artificial light and too much dampness. However, this worthy investigator forsakes all systems of espionage and asks the members of the Senior classes of several prominent institutions for their opinions on the value of college training. Of course the main difficulty with this mode of procedure is that the information is sure to be of a specious nature. Just now the members of the graduating classes are at the most enthusiastic phase of their collegiate life. The term of academic work is drawing to a close, and all are bouyant with hopes for the future. Thus all are sure to view their college careers in retrospect with optimism, and to say they have reaped untold advantages from their four years of academic life. Yet to be really valuable, such information as to the relation of college training to future success can be given only after future success, or failure, has been achieved. In other words, graduates of twenty-five or fifty years standing are far better qualified to commit themselves on be question. However, in spite of its imitations, we welcome this new way of approaching the problem. Only too much have the notions of prejudiced and ill-natured opinions prevailed and influenced the public's conception of the value and meaning of collegiate training.

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