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CURRENT "MUSICAL REVIEW"

Critic Finds March Number Contains Timely and Interesting Articles on Matters of Interest.

By A. T. Davison jr.

To those who have forecasted a short life for the new contender in the field of collegiate literature the March number of "The Harvard Musical Review" should be in the nature of a revelation. For there is not the conscientious and laborious filling-in of space which one often meets with in magazines devoted to the consideration of a single subject. Here, on the contrary, are assembled articles and notes on current musical matters of immediate interest and upon its element even more than upon literary excellence depends the life and power of an undergraduate publication such as this.

Notable are Mr. Gilbert's delightful article on music among the North American Indians and Mr. Eschman's clear exposition of the operatic situation in Germany which bids fair to assume international importance. Then there is critical discussion of four operas recently produced in this country, one of them by an American. Mr. Hall's article on M. Aubert is particularly apt in that the first American performances of his opera "La Foret Bleue" are now taking place in this city.

The "Review" contains also a short but eloquent appreciation of the life and labors of Mr. William F. Apthorp '69, long a distinguished musical critic of Boston; an excellent likeness of the late Professor John K. Paine, founder of the Department of Music in this University; a compilation by Professor Spalding of the names of Harvard graduates engaged in various musical activities; a short poem to Edwin Grasse, the blind violinist who gave a concert here not long ago; two songs by Mr. S. F. Damon '14. "To Blossoms" and "A Quoi Bon Entendre," the first preferable in mood and workmanship; and finally book-review, editorial, and foreign correspondence.

The March "Review" will find a welcome with all who are interested in musical questions of the hour.

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