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MERELY REITERATION.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

We have read the announcement of changes in History courses for next year with interest and regret. Year after year students have wished for an adequate course on United States History since the Formation of the Union, and this year the Scholarship Committee of the Student Council has embodied a request for such a course in its recommendations. History 13 does not fulfill the object because it deals too minutely with constitutional and party development: History 17 covers only the History of the West. Thus there is no course which gives a general survey of our national development in such a way as to make it attractive for a student who is not specializing in History. We are ashamed to admit that many of us leave college with less knowledge of our own history than of that of Greece and Rome. It may be that acquaintance with American History should have been made in preparation for college, but this argument may be applied with equal force to English Composition which is required of all Freshmen. The fact remains that we cannot learn that history after we come to college and must, therefore, go without it. We are confident that eventually a general course in United States History will be given and we know that it will be a popular and worthy course. It is merely a question of how long we must wait.

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