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DINING COUNCIL ELECTIONS.

In a University of large size, where the student body is bound to be unwieldy and disorganized the influence of the dining halls as social centres and unifying forces should be allowed its fullest application. Every means ought to be exerted to make the institutions attractive and so to increase their memberships. Undoubtedly in recent years the conditions at Memorial Hall have been, greatly ameliorated, and this improvement has found expression in augmented membership. The University Dining Council, which is composed in the majority, of students, has been instrumental in bringing about better conditions, and so far as introducing changes from the point of view and for the satisfaction of the student body is concerned, the Council has more than justified its existence.

In spite of this commendable service students are not very conversant with the past service and present functions of the Council. This body exist to do all in its power to increase the efficiency of the dining halls, and requests men who are dissatisfied or see ways for improvement to submit all suggestions. Because the University Dining Council has to deal with institutions that are of such importance in the social life of Harvard, it deserves to be regarded as the organ that represents the students body and is prepared to serve it to the utmost capacity. Two fundamental considerations should be borne in mind today in electing new men to the Council. First, voters should ask who are the nominees best suited to carry on this work. Secondly, they should remember that when the Council is constituted, all should resort to it when they believe they have causes for complaint or suggestions for improvement. These men who are elected to represent the membership of the halls before the authorities have a peculiarly opportune chance to be of real service to their follows. In no other place is communication between the student and the management so desirable or so indispensable.

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