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CONCENTRATION AND DISTRIBUTION

There has been a feeling prevalent in the University that the intricacies of the system of concentration and distribution are not sufficiently clear to Freshmen, and that the average man does not begin to understand them before the end of his Sophomore or the beginning of his Junior year. This feeling has come to a head in recent discussions in the Student Council. From these it appears that many men find that they are taking courses which are of no value to them or even concentrating in fields in which they have no interest. They see their advisers probably not more that three or four times during their Freshman year, and obviously the advisers have little opportunity to know what a man is really fitted for or even interested in.

To remedy this, several plans have been suggested. One recommends that a whole week of English A be spent in explaining concentration and distribution. In this week there would be four lectures, and at each lecture the head of one of the four departments would explain the courses in his department, of what particular value each course was, and what professors were giving them. There is another idea; namely, that there be a wide compaign of education in the high and preparatory schools in order that men should come to college not completely ignorant of the system. This could only be accomplished through the active co-operation of the schools themselves, but it is felt that the principals of all schools will see the value of the scheme. The system of concentration and distribution is already pulling its weight in the University. The object of these suggestions is to lighten the weight by clearing up the obscurities connected with this immensely important subject.

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