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TRIALS TONIGHT FOR INSTRUMENTAL CLUBS

Another Opportunity for Candidates to be Given This Evening at 7 o'Clock in Music Building--Plan Concerts Before Big Games

Candidates for the Instrumental Clubs who did not report yesterday can do so tonight at seven o'clock in the Music Building. Although a large number tried out last evening, the club is anxious to have more candidates tonight so that it may be able to choose its members from all available material. Any member of the University who can play the mandolin, banjo, guitar, violin, 'cello, string bass, saxophone, cornet, trombone, or traps is eligible for the trials.

Rehearsals will begin the latter part of this week in order to prepare for the annual concert at Princeton the night before the University-Princeton football game. This concert means a week-end trip to Princeton taking in both the game and the prom which comes the night before. There will also be a concert before the Yale game. Both concerts will be given in conjunction with the University Glee Club.

Western Trip Planned

Among the plans for the coming year, a trip to Cleveland during the Christmas holidays is being arranged. Several of the officers of the club this summer visited cities which will be included in the proposed tour. The booking has been entirely tentative, however, since permission has not been obtained as yet from the College authorities.

The Instrumental Clubs represents the lighter side of collegiate music, presenting programs of popular and light classical music, college songs, and Harvard football songs. The organization is divided into a mandolin club and a banjo club. The mandolin club features semi-classical selections, while the banjo club limits itself to football songs and popular music. In addition the club introduces specialties such as a jazzy orchestra and a male octet. The officers this year are J. F. Bradlee '22, president; Howard Elliot '22, leader; E. H. Smith '22, secretary and treasurer; J. L. Walker '23, manager. The organization will be coached by William Rice.

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