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TO FURTHER PEACE

The announcement in another column of this issue concerning the Woodrow Wilson Foundation is of more than passing interest. For the first time in the history of the nation, a definite, organized attempt is being made to honor one of its famous citizens during his life-time. Memorials are usually conceived by mourning friends; this one is planned by admiring enthusiasts.

Were the Foundation proposed for the sole purpose of perpetuating Mr. Wilson's fame and statesmanship, a question might easily be raised as to the university of its appeal. But it is not. It is proposed for the purpose of furthering, the ultimate aims and ideals for which he labored--ideas with which few people--regardless of their opinions as to his abilities as an administrator will disagree. Awards for "meritorious service to democracy, public, welfare, liberal thought or peace through justice" are standards against which only the most narrowly prejudiced can take up arms. Technical scientists do not oppose the existence of the Nobel Literature Prize.

The Foundation, counting as it does some of the best-known of the nation's citizens among its charter members, will be ably and carefully handled. It should have little difficulty in realizing its hopes.

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