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WUXTRY! ALL HA'VA'D TIGHT!

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

That there are men in Harvard who do drink is surely no new or cataclysmic discovery. This fact plus the opinions of Professor Cabot, gained from his investigations, are just the sort of news which the sensation-mad public devours so voraciously in print. Professor Cabot's conclusions, and he himself is the first to admit it, are drawn from answers to questionnaires which record mainly mere student impressions. The lack of accurate statistics is the very thing which is sure to be over-looked in the hourly extras whose headlines, in all probability, will shrill forth the blasting scandal that 60 per cent of Harvard drinks.

Dr. Cabot's experiment, although admittedly inconclusive and unsatisfactory, points the way to a solution of the problem he has attacked. If he had first defined the terms "moderate drinker" and "heavy drinker" and then asked his students to tabulate their own conduct, definite statistics from one group of men at least would have been the result. A much more interesting and valuable set of statistics could be obtained from a similar census of the whole college. Confronted with such figures that delightful myth, so popular among comic writers and moralists of the older generation, which patterns college life as a constant rush from gin lo Scotch must shrivel and die. A more scientific discussion of the whole problem of prohibition might be inaugurated by the gathering of detailed and accurate statistics.

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