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"MR. TUNNEY IN CARD TRICKS"

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

These are lively days for the triumphant Mr. Tunney--first Bernard Shaw and now the New York police force, neither of which is easily ignored. The beau ideal of the Marines turned, as champions and ex-champions always have turned, to the vaudeville stage where he was scheduled to give "fistic exhibitions". But when he attempted to appear the first night, at one of the Loew palaces in New York, he was arrested for breaking a statute against boxing. Brute strength had to yield to respect for legal restrictions and the philosopher of the gloves was forced to remain off-stage, though not without cutting remarks on law in general.

Sympathy is due Mr. Tunney why should he be prevented from capitalizing his fame? Others have had no trouble in performing in front of footlights--and many were less adroit boxers than Gene. There is, of course, a law, but there are manifold ways, of avoiding it: wearing evening clothes over boxing tights is one method, and Mr. Tunney found that constant use has dulled its aptitude. Doubtless he will new get a more supple lawyer, one versed in such acrobatics as getting away with an improper thing in a perfectly proper manner. But in the interim there are no "fistic exhibitions", and the champion is left to reflect bitterly on the inconstancy of fortune. No one--except perhaps Mr. Dempsey -- will blame Mr. Tunney for giving birth to the blues.

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