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"1776" SEEKS NEW LAUREL IN BOSTON SHOW TONIGHT

WILSON STARS AS CROWDS PACK METROPOLITAN HOUSES

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

With the acclaim of audiences from New York to Detroit still ringing in their ears, the Hasty Pudding players will make their Boston debut this evening at 8.15 o'clock in the Hollis Street Theatre.

The western tour which was the first in the history of the Hasty Pudding Show proved to be an unqualified success. The actors played to large audiences in Buffalo, Cleveland, Detroit, and Pittsburgh and were everywhere received with great enthusiasm.

It New York the recently finished Mecca temple, which is one of the largest theatres in the City was crowded to capacity, and a large number of subscriptions turned down.

The players returned to Cambridge yesterday after the final performance of the tour in New York Friday night, and are now in readiness for a three nights' run in Boston. This will be the first real opportunity that the Boston public has had to see "1776," this year's much landed show, since almost all the seats in the Cambridge productions before vacation were taken by Harvard students and their intimate friends.

Orchestra Seats Sold Out

The orchestra of the Hollis Street Theatre is already sold out for the three nights, but a number of balcony seats may still be had.

Comments on the show during its course from Northampton to New York, seem to indicate that its popularity is based on the well trained dancing and acting of the ensemble, as well as on the performances of the individual stars from which it drew its success last year.

W. S. Wilson '27, the premiere danseuse of the piece, has received continued praise for his graceful dancing and realistic impersonation of a Colonial belle.

G. H. Henderson '28, has kept even pace with this fairer playmate in the number of encores he has evoked from all the audiences before when the show has been given. His playing on the goofus and on the harpsicord has drawn forth unceasing amusement and applause.

Of the dances which have attracted attention, the uniform dance just before the close of the show seems to be the most popular.

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