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The development of the motion picture has, curiously enough, been tied up with the evolution of its etymology. In the realm of entertainment, its first love, it has commonly been designated as "movie", "the silent screen" and finally as "talkie." As a dubious participator on the outer fringe of Art it bore somewhat proudly the name "cinema", with French embellishments. Happily harmonious in its simplicity, the word "film" has always distinguished the offspring of Edison in its cursory invasion of the laboratory.

There have been some who have always claimed that the true contribution of the motion picture to civilization is as another tool of Science. Certainly, the movie as an academician has had some degree of success in the field of Geology, Physics and Biology. The suggestion, elsewhere in today's CRIMSON, of Professor Friedrich that the film has a rightful place in Social Science offers, perhaps, the soundest application yet conceived of the invention. As he says, actual sight and sound of legislative' bodies in action would add tremendous vitality to the sometimes deadened lectures concerning those parliaments. Professor Friedrich's proposal, if carried out, should undoubtedly fix the word "film" as the permanent derivation from the original, "moving picture."

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