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LOWELL SAYS HARVARD TYPE IS NON-EXISTENT

ABSOLUTE AUTHORITY UNKNOWN AT HARVARD

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

When asked by one of the visiting Brazilian educators to define the typical Harvard man, President Lowell said, "The Harvard man intellectually, morally, and socially, is better than a graduate of any other college; and the graduate of any other college is equally superior to the Harvard man. There is no such thing as a Harvard type nor is there any man typical of any college."

During the course of the conversation among President Lowell and the two Brazilians, Drs. de Couto a Silva and Leonardos, the President outlined the theory upon which Harvard undergraduate education is based. He explained that students in the college are given, in theory and to the furthest extent practically possible, a purely cultural education. He pointed out that "telescoping" of elementary courses and those of a professional character is avoided at Harvard as much as possible. In describing the administrative system employed in the University he drew the analogy of judge and jury. "The Faculty," he explained, "represents the judge, the expert, and the Corporation is analogous to the jury, laymen of affairs." In the Harvard administration there is no seat of absolute power and the success of the organization has depended upon a sympathetic cooperation between the two bodies with the President as "liaison officer." "If any one were to ask wherein lies absolute power, the answer would be 'Nobody knows'".

Earlier in the morning the two delegates from Brazil, whose prime interest is university administration, conferred with President Stratton, of M. I. T. President Stratton remarked that most universities in the United States lack sufficient organization. He said that the specialist is allowed ample freedom in what he teaches but that he is permitted, and demands, too much voice in the affairs of the university in which he is not well versed.

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