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RARE COIN COLLECTION ON EXHIBITION AT FOGG

COINS LOANED TO MUSEUM BY L. C. BRIGGS '31

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Among the several interesting loan exhibitions shown at the Fogg Museum during the summer is a collection of coins lent by L. C. Briggs '31. The collection is composed of English coins before 1272, coins which influence this series or were contemporary with it, and also miscellaneous coins of historical interest.

The oldest coins in the collection of British money date back to 150 B. C. These coins are found equally in France and Southern England and are believed by some to be Gaulish but it is more likely that they are copied from a Gaulish type.

Another interesting series includes the coins of England before the country became united under one king. In this group is the coin of St. Edmund which was probably struck out about 900 for circulation in East Anglia.

Also on display is the series including the sole monarchy of England before the conquest. This series includes the coins of Canute, king of Denmark and England. He was the king of whom the story is told that he commanded the tide to stop rising. His coins show a feature common to this series, a voided cross on the reverse design. The purpose of this cross was to afford a convenient gauge for cutting the coins into halves and quarters as the practice was then to make change by cutting the penny. A half penny so cut is shown among the coins of Canute.

Among the coins of the post-conquest period before 1272 is one of Prince Henry, Earl of Northumberland. He was the son of David I and great grandson of the Duncan who has a prominent part in Shakespeare's tragedy, "Macbeth".

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