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HANFORD'S REPORT SHOWS UPTURN IN STUDENT RECORDS

Curriculum Must Not Be Made Too Hard For the Student With Only Average Ability

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Contrary to the prevalent belief that Harvard's over rising academic standards have produced an equivalent increase in the number of those dropped from College for scholastic reasons, Dean Hanford's report, issued recently from University Hall, proves that there has actually been a steady drop in the mortality list during the past decade. But at the same time the proportion of upperclassmen approved as candidates for honors has shot up.

Despite this improvement, Dean Hanford feels that "The proportion of failures . . is still too high for a College which has a selective process of admission and we should constantly strive to see to it that all the assistance legitimately desirable is given to the willing but less gifted student and that our curriculum and general plan of education are such as to interest, broaden, and develop the non-scholarly type of youth."

In detail Dean Hanford said that "Now and then one hears complaints that with the increasing attention given to honors work and with the improvements in scholarship it has become more difficult for the student of average ability to remain in Harvard College. This conclusion is not borne out by the statistics regarding the number of students who do so poorly that their connection has to be severed.

"During the same period that the proportion of men graduating with honors has increased so markedly, the proportion of undergraduates who have had their connection severed has in general shown a slight downward trend from 7.9 per cent in 1923 and 8.5 per cent in 1924 to 6.2 per cent, 5.4 per cent, and 6 per cent respectively in 1932, 1933, 1934.

"The proportion of failures, however, is still too high for a College which has a selective process of admission and we should constantly strive to see to it that all the assistance legitimately desirable is given to the willing but less gifted student and that our curriculum and general plan of education are such as to interest, broaden, and develop the non-scholarly type of youth."

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