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HUBBARD REPORT CITES LACK OF CITY PLANNERS

SCHOOL COOPERATING WITH OTHER UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENTS

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Increased demand for city and regional "planners" was the chief subject discussed in the annual report of the Harvard School of City Planning, released yesterday. The report was prepared by Henry V. Hubbard '97, Charles Dyer Norton Professor of Regional Planning and chairman of the school's council.

The sudden lack of an adequate supply of planners was attributed to the recent growth of governmental activities requiring some form of planning.

Planning Must Be Comprehensive

Much of this government work has required planning for "specific and partial needs", Mr. Hubbard believes. "This may be unavoidable," he said, "but planning which is not comprehensive is often ineffective."

To meet the need for men export in comprehensive planning, the school has obtained the cooperation of other departments of the University in training its men. Last year the school required its students to take courses in Landscape Architecture, Architecture, Engineering, Fine Arts, and Government, and urged them to take elective courses in Economics and Sociology, Mr. Hubbard said.

All Good Planning Social

"All good planning is social in its purposes, economic in its consideration of man's resources, governmental in its administration, and physical in its effect on the material environment of mankind," he continued.

"The Harvard school fully realizes that all of these aspects are essential to planning but it believes that with the facilities in design afforded by its close relation to the Schools of Architecture and Landscape Architecture it should emphasize physical planning as the field of its more specific professional training, increasing, however, the present interrelation of its work with other departments of the University specializing in other interlocking parts of the whole planning problem."

In addition to its training of professional city and regional planners, the school is now offering instruction in city planning to men specializing in other professions. In this connection Mr. Hubbard urged that a course in city planning "be open to undergraduates and be counted toward a Harvard Bachelor's degree, as offering a kind of knowledge which might reasonably form a part of the preparation of an educated man to take his place in moderen society."

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