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TRAFFIC REFORM LAWS GAIN STUDENT SUPPORT

COLLEGE VOTE COINCIDES WITH DISTRICT POLL

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Student opinion at Harvard and seven other northeastern colleges follows the trend at large for their district in support of measures for automobile traffic reform.

Three Measures

"Uniform traffic laws," "strict drivers' tests," and "compulsory auto insurance" ranked first, second, and third in favor in the statistics compiled by the New York Herald-Tribune and the college newspapers.

At the universities these measures led the way with majorities of 88, 87, and 79 per cent respectively.

Three More

Remaining three proposals in the poll, "governors," "severe penalties," and "special marking of cars" drew national favor of 68 per cent or higher, but were generally lower through the northeast.

Only at Mt. Holyoke, Wellesley, and Seth Low, of Brooklyn, did any of these measures reach or pass the 50 per cent mark.

Abnormal tabulations showed 20 per cent of the students at Wellesley in favor of "compulsory insurance" and 68 per cent at Mt. Holyoke voting for "governors." Dartmouth, Pennsylvania, Russell Sage, of Troy, New York, and Yale were the other colleges participating in the poll.

Herald figures also showed that the South, leading the mortality rate for automobile deaths with 20 or more per 10,000 cars headed the vote for safety measures. In general the Northeast, last in fatalities, stood last in reform support.

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