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The History of Harvard's Commencement, Explained

HARVARD DEBATES WITH MIDDLEBURY BY RADIO

CRIMSON REPRESENTED BY PEEL, SULLIVAN, COHRMAN

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Upholding the affirmative side of the proposition: "Resolved, That the extension of consumers' cooperatives would contribute to the public welfare," the Varsity debaters went into action yesterday afternoon in a radio debate against Middlebury.

Terming the extension of this movement as "a panacea looking well on paper, but acting as a boomerang in practice," a negative accused the "gentlemen of Harvard" of viewing the subject unrealistically.

Harvard, represented by John A. Sullivan '38, Howard Cohrman '38, and F. Welch Peel '39, showed that an extension of cooperatives was if anything practical, as it aimed directly towards remedying the sorry plight of the helpless consumer of today.

Tutoring Schools Questioned

In the second of a series of trial debates designed to prepare members for intercollegiate contests later in the year, the Union Debating Council, in its meeting held in the upper common room of the Union last night, used as the topic for discussion: "Resolved That students should be prohibited from attending tutoring schools."

Enno R. Hobbing and David Aberle speaking for the affirmative, pointed out that "tutoring schools controvert the purpose of a college education," while the negative, which was later voted the winner, upheld by Paul Cherington and Julian Hess, justified the tutoring school as an aid to faulty college instruction.

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