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FACULTY COUNCIL PASSES PLAN FOR CREDIT IN SCHOOLS

Mathematics A, Latin B, Greek B, and French 2 May Be Skipped by Those Who Pass Four-Year Examinations

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Another stop in advancing the level of men entering the Freshman class has been taken by the Faculty Council, it was learned last night. A modification of Plan B, to allow high-ranking students greater credit for college work done in school, thereby doing away with certain elementary courses, has been approved and will be tried out this spring.

The plan provides for only two examinations beside English A and the Scholastic aptitude test, instead of the three of elementary grade now required. It will be applicable to the best students in some of the 20 schools which have recently been cooperating with the University in giving advanced or semi-collegiate instruction to their highest-ranking men. These men will be allowed to take an advanced College Entrance Board examination, representing at least four years of work, (except in the case of Greek) in two of the following: French 4, German 4, Latin 4, Greek 3, and Mathematics Gamma.

Those passing such examinations satisfactorily will be allowed, subject to the individual veto of the Department concerned, to skip Mathematics A, Latin B, of theGreek B, and French 2 (French E next year). In Chemistry, Physics, and Biology such students will be given advanced standing beyond that of the ordinary Freshman in some manner not yet determined. In History it will still be impossible to pass off History 1 in school no matter how much preparation has been done. The same is of course true in Sociology, Psychology, Economics and other Departments not represented by a College Board Examination.

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