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HILLYER FOLLOWS COPEY IN VACANT BOYLSTON CHAIR

Professor Copeland, Last Incumbent, Became Emeritus in '28; John Quincy Adams First Incumbent in '06

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Robert S. Hillyer '17, associate professor of English, has been named Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory, effective September 1, it was announced this morning.

The University has chosen a successor to the Faculty chair which Copey left to become emeritus nine years ago.

Founded in 1771, the Boylston professorship is Harvard's fourth oldest endowed chair and one of her most distinguished posts. John Quincy Adams was first incumbent in 1806. Others have been Joseph McKean, Edward T. Channing, Francis J. Child, Adams S. Hill, Le Baron Russell Briggs, and Charles Townsend Copeland.

Hillyer Won Pulitzer Prize

Professor Hillyer holds literary fame as one of America's ranking living poets. His "Collected Verse," voted the best book of poems published in this country in 1933, won him the Pulitzer Prize in the following year.

He first came to Harvard in 1919 and was at Trinity College in Connecticut from 1926 to 1928, when he returned here to become an assistant professor and in 1932 an associate professor.

Poet and scholar, he is also a soldier. The year of his graduation he was driving an ambulance for the French at Verdun, and during the next two years served as a lieutenant under the Stars and Stripes.

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