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TO HIS MEMORY

THE MAIL

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Last July Frank Monroe was killed by an automobile. Frank was not just a person; he was an institution that served with unbounding geniality the users of the Indoor Athletic Building since the day it opened in 1930. He handed out towels to the swimming and basketball teams and others that have passed by and he was a friend to all. He was a stream of laughter that did not desiccate when Freshmen asked, one after another, for information posted nearby. He know everyone's first name, as well as their last, and their human peculiarities. He knew how to flatter an athletic without swelling his head. His sense of humor was spontaneous and wholesome, and he was never without it. Frank was a personality, not a mere person, and in his seven years of service to Harvard University, he drew many close friends from those who saw him every day, every month. He would listen to their troubles without telling his own and lighten them with a smile and a joke. For Frank was an institution, and will be greatly missed by all those that knew him.

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