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DEBATERS DEFEND NEW DEAL IN B.C. CONTEST

FEATURE OF B.C. GOLDEN JUBILEE IS BROADCAST

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Before a highly enthusiastic audience last night at the Copley Theatre, Harvard debaters William W. Hancock '38 and Richard W. Sullivan '39 defended the New Deal, in a no-decision contest, against Boston College. Chief Justice John P. Higgins of the Superior Court presided.

Francis Sullivan and Paul Schultz, present and past presidents of the Fulton Debating Society of B.C. upheld the affirmative.

A major feature of the Boston College's Golden Jubilee Celebration being held this week, the debate, attended by an audience of over 400, was broadcast in its entirety over station WAAB. Ability of the speakers was put to a test over the highly controversial subject of "Resolved, That the New Deal program of business regulation is detrimental to the better interest of the American people."

Claiming that the New Deal's business policy was the cause of the present slump, the Boston College team asserted that it was fundamentally harmful to American business, that it fostered collectivism as opposed to free enterprise, and that it engendered class strife.

Webb and Sullivan in answer argued that the New Deal benefitted the American people as members of the economic system, that it remedied old conditions of abuse. In proving their stand that Roosevelt's program was beneficial, they pointed to the relatively prosperous years between 1933 and 1937 when the program was in effect. Moreover, the present slump would have been worse, they said, but for the remedial legislation advocated by the New Deal.

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