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BARTLETT WINS NOTED AWARD IN CHEMISTRY

$1000 PRIZE WILL BE PRESENTED IN SEPTEMBER.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

"As far as I can see, my research has no commercial application; it will cure no disease," declared Paul D. Bartlett, 30-year-old assistant professor of chemistry and winner of this year's $1000 prize in pure chemistry awarded yesterday by the American Chemical Society.

This award was made for progress in research which involves the application of the methods of physical chemistry to the problems of organic chemistry. Bartlett explained, "This approach proved valuable in checking certain much-debated theories concerning molecular rearrangements and additional reactions of halogens to carbon compounds."

Bartlett pointed out that although chemical equations show components and results, they do not actually reveal the nature of the process involved. His accomplishments will indirectly help other chemists to solve problems in organic chemistry.

This year the age limit of eligible candidates for the award was raised from 30 to 35 years as it was held that the younger men had not passed through the experimental stage. By the age of 35, it was assumed that they were well into the theoretical.

The funds for the 1938 prize were donated by Professor James E. Kendall, head of the Department of Chemistry at Ediuburgh University. The prize will be presented at the Society's 96th meeting in Milwankee in September.

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