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A FABLE, INSPIRED BY THE HARVARD PUMP

THE MAIL

To the Editor of the Crimson:

George Washington had the first pump in Virginia, while all others were still using sweeps and windlasses. It was a wooden pump; and one day it just wooden pump. The Virginians got so dirty (I did not say thirsty) for lack of water, that George was figuring how to fix it, when a "Good Neighbor" from Hide-out Park happened along, named Fuddy-Duddy Rosey. Said he, "All that pumps ever need, is priming. So I will hire 10 million able-bodied men to carry water in cute little May-baskets, from the Privy, Treasury to prime it." So he primed it for seven years. When it still did not work, he said, "I will not let my people down; I will prime for 70 times 7 years, and if it does not work then, at least I have made 10 million swell jobs, and anyhow I am working on a fine steam turbine up in the attic."

But George said, "If 7 years won't prime it, that is not the answer. It used to work!! Where are the men that made it work before? Come here men! Make it work the way it used to, and then we will think about that steam turbine." Laurence Hart,   Germantown, Pa.

(Ed. note Hart, a student at Harvard during the summer of 1933, is a nephew of Albert Bushnell Hart '30, Eaton Professor of Government Emeritus.)

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