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THE MOVIEGOER

At the U.T.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

"Come Live With Me," which heads the double bill at the U.T., is not the witty, sophisticated farce that it tries very hard to be. On the other hand, it has some touches of humor and acting that save it from being the slow wash-out that so many Hollywood comedies have been in recent months. The plot concerns the trails and tribulations of James Stewart, an impecunious writer, and Hedy Lamarr, a refugee without citizenship papers, when the latter requests the former to marry her to save her from deportation. This situation is complicated by the fact that Ian Hunter wants to marry Miss Lamarr but is unable to because of all things, he is already married.

The chief asset of the picture is that it manages to end just as the audience approaches the yawning point; or rather, it manages to hold the yawning point off till just a little before the end. A picture like this, in order to be successful, should have witty dialogue and an amusing plot. The plot, however, though it has possibilities, is hidden under a dearth of funny remarks. In addition to this, the director is completely lacking in any tense of timing or say appreciation for the subtler side of enjoyment; his sense of humor does not extend far beyond the limits of the delayed response, or much higher than the level of 23 skidoo. The acting of the film is passable though not exceptional, particularly since no great histrionic capabilities are necessary.

The second half of the bill, "Convoy," is a good, exciting bit of British propaganda. Like "The Lion Has Wings," it doesn't care much about plot, but concentrates on proving that all Englishmen are gentlemen and that the British Navy is supreme. The sequences of a naval battle between a British cruiser and a German pocket battleship are especially good.

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