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THE MOVIEGOER

At the U.T.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

AT THE PENWAY AND PARAMOUNT

Mr. Allen assures us that he is satisfied with the transformation of "Anthony Adverse", and there is no reason for the moviegoer to feel otherwise. The celluloid Anthony differs, to be sure, from the paper one, but so long as the movie is good in itself, a comparison is more or less idle.

Fredric March plays the moody, restive adventurer with admirable restraint and vigor, and Olivia de Havilland gives a vivid likeness of the passionate and equally vacillatory heroine. The ponderous weight of the thing is distinctly felt at the occasional points where Anthony becomes a prosaic globe trotter, but his genius for running into adversity usually lends the needed romance.

AT LOEW'S STATE AND ORPHEUM

"Dodsworth" gives us Sinclair Lewis's most human story expertly dramatized by a first-rate cast. Sam Dodsworth, an American business man but not a Babbitt, marries a wife younger than himself who cannot accept middle age gracefully. Palled with her one kittenish escapade after another, Sam finally refuses to save Fran from her latest scrape, and leaves the attractive would-be girl to go her way.

The part of Dodsworth is given breadth and depth by Walter Huston, who could act anything. Ruth Chatterton amazes one with her mastery of the character of Fran.

AT THE METROPOLITAN

"The Big Broadcast of 1937", premature only in name, is best described by an enumeration of the people in it. Jack Benny, Martha Raye, Bob (Bazooka) Burns, George Burns and Gracie Allen, and Benny Goodman and his orchestra, all go their highly individualistic ways, with occasional amusing collisions. That crowd is bound to be good, and it's quite a thrill for the radio fan to see all those disembodied voices step into the flesh, if only two-dimensional and black-and-white. On the stage we have Dave Apollon and his 1937 revue, is just like any other revue. The ventriloquist is very good.

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