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NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

As the price complaints turned in at 14 Plympton Street betrayed the effect, of rising costs on other-than-food prices, the possibility appeared yesterday that Mayor John Lynch of Cambridge might support what promises to be a general Buyers' Strike Day next Tuesday by issuing an official proclamation.

According to the Harvard Chapter, A. V. C. one of the groups backing Tuesday's parade, they have been requested by the regional office of the OPA to do what they can to publicize the Department of Labor's daily charts of price rises in the 28 basic communities, information which most Boston papers are said to be unwilling to print prominently.

(Of the Boston dailies, only the Christion Science Monitor has been playing up the effects of inflation and the organization of buyer's strikes. A summary of the Department of Labor's release appeared in Tuesday's CRIMSON.

Alumnus Objects

Reaction to the campaign to keep the cost of living down has come from as far west as Buffalo, where an alumnus, head of an advertising agency and owner of eight retail meat markets, attacked the CRIMSON'S views as "non-economic" and "misled by OPA propaganda," and its methods as "child-like."

The only major report on clothiers so far concerned J. Press, who attributed its $15 boost as due to increased cost of fabrics although the trade at large had not expected upped wool prices to appear in the finished product so soon.

In denying the report of an increase in the price of a ham sandwich, the manager of Hazen's pointed out that ham prices had gone up less than beef but that customers, particularly at night, demanded hamburg. If customers asked for the less-costly product, he said he would not buy the more costly one.

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