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Washington Pickets Receive Support From 300 Demonstrators in Boston

By Lawrence W. Feinberg

peace picketers in Washington received an impressive demonstration support outside the Massachusetts House yesterday afternoon.

Approximately 300 demonstrators-- housewives and students from area high schools and colleges-- along Beacont St. from 2 to 4 carrying signs which stressed the of nuclear war and urged .

General demonstrators distributed the policy statement adopted by the Toward Peace Student Council for Washington.

The demonstration was organized by organizations, although the bulk picketers was assembled by the of Women, a disarmament group last November.

3:45 p.m. leaders of the participate groups entered the State House to with Governor John A. Volpe. , the governor refused to meet delegation because of other committees. Instead, his appointment secretary James Killan, heard their pleas for reconsideration of the State fallout shelter building program and for State action to remove strontium 90 from milk.

Killan treated the delegation cordially. However, Mrs. Eugene Belisle, New England chairman of the Voice of Women, said she was "very disappointed" that they could not meet the governor.

Among the demonstrators were 30 small children. One four-year-old boy carried a sign reading "I want to be a daddy some day." His white armband was cut from a diaper. The youngest demonstrator, aged 5 1/2 months, slept in his carriage most of the afternoon.

Several of the adult picketers carried signs with apocalyptic quotations from William Blake. Others simply had the word "peace" or "pax" on signs hung over their chests or backs. Only a handful of Harvard students and faculty members participated.

Just before the demonstration broke up with a march to the Park Street subway, Tony Marquez, a veteran opponent of disarmament groups, passed out literature criticizing their proposals.

Meanwhile, Tocsin distributed about 150 blue armbands at Harvard and Radcliffe yesterday. Robert A. Sable '63, chairman of the project, called the response "fair."

about 120 more demonstrators left Cambridge by bus at 10:15 last night.

Approximately 300 demonstrators-- housewives and students from area high schools and colleges-- along Beacont St. from 2 to 4 carrying signs which stressed the of nuclear war and urged .

General demonstrators distributed the policy statement adopted by the Toward Peace Student Council for Washington.

The demonstration was organized by organizations, although the bulk picketers was assembled by the of Women, a disarmament group last November.

3:45 p.m. leaders of the participate groups entered the State House to with Governor John A. Volpe. , the governor refused to meet delegation because of other committees. Instead, his appointment secretary James Killan, heard their pleas for reconsideration of the State fallout shelter building program and for State action to remove strontium 90 from milk.

Killan treated the delegation cordially. However, Mrs. Eugene Belisle, New England chairman of the Voice of Women, said she was "very disappointed" that they could not meet the governor.

Among the demonstrators were 30 small children. One four-year-old boy carried a sign reading "I want to be a daddy some day." His white armband was cut from a diaper. The youngest demonstrator, aged 5 1/2 months, slept in his carriage most of the afternoon.

Several of the adult picketers carried signs with apocalyptic quotations from William Blake. Others simply had the word "peace" or "pax" on signs hung over their chests or backs. Only a handful of Harvard students and faculty members participated.

Just before the demonstration broke up with a march to the Park Street subway, Tony Marquez, a veteran opponent of disarmament groups, passed out literature criticizing their proposals.

Meanwhile, Tocsin distributed about 150 blue armbands at Harvard and Radcliffe yesterday. Robert A. Sable '63, chairman of the project, called the response "fair."

about 120 more demonstrators left Cambridge by bus at 10:15 last night.

General demonstrators distributed the policy statement adopted by the Toward Peace Student Council for Washington.

The demonstration was organized by organizations, although the bulk picketers was assembled by the of Women, a disarmament group last November.

3:45 p.m. leaders of the participate groups entered the State House to with Governor John A. Volpe. , the governor refused to meet delegation because of other committees. Instead, his appointment secretary James Killan, heard their pleas for reconsideration of the State fallout shelter building program and for State action to remove strontium 90 from milk.

Killan treated the delegation cordially. However, Mrs. Eugene Belisle, New England chairman of the Voice of Women, said she was "very disappointed" that they could not meet the governor.

Among the demonstrators were 30 small children. One four-year-old boy carried a sign reading "I want to be a daddy some day." His white armband was cut from a diaper. The youngest demonstrator, aged 5 1/2 months, slept in his carriage most of the afternoon.

Several of the adult picketers carried signs with apocalyptic quotations from William Blake. Others simply had the word "peace" or "pax" on signs hung over their chests or backs. Only a handful of Harvard students and faculty members participated.

Just before the demonstration broke up with a march to the Park Street subway, Tony Marquez, a veteran opponent of disarmament groups, passed out literature criticizing their proposals.

Meanwhile, Tocsin distributed about 150 blue armbands at Harvard and Radcliffe yesterday. Robert A. Sable '63, chairman of the project, called the response "fair."

about 120 more demonstrators left Cambridge by bus at 10:15 last night.

The demonstration was organized by organizations, although the bulk picketers was assembled by the of Women, a disarmament group last November.

3:45 p.m. leaders of the participate groups entered the State House to with Governor John A. Volpe. , the governor refused to meet delegation because of other committees. Instead, his appointment secretary James Killan, heard their pleas for reconsideration of the State fallout shelter building program and for State action to remove strontium 90 from milk.

Killan treated the delegation cordially. However, Mrs. Eugene Belisle, New England chairman of the Voice of Women, said she was "very disappointed" that they could not meet the governor.

Among the demonstrators were 30 small children. One four-year-old boy carried a sign reading "I want to be a daddy some day." His white armband was cut from a diaper. The youngest demonstrator, aged 5 1/2 months, slept in his carriage most of the afternoon.

Several of the adult picketers carried signs with apocalyptic quotations from William Blake. Others simply had the word "peace" or "pax" on signs hung over their chests or backs. Only a handful of Harvard students and faculty members participated.

Just before the demonstration broke up with a march to the Park Street subway, Tony Marquez, a veteran opponent of disarmament groups, passed out literature criticizing their proposals.

Meanwhile, Tocsin distributed about 150 blue armbands at Harvard and Radcliffe yesterday. Robert A. Sable '63, chairman of the project, called the response "fair."

about 120 more demonstrators left Cambridge by bus at 10:15 last night.

3:45 p.m. leaders of the participate groups entered the State House to with Governor John A. Volpe. , the governor refused to meet delegation because of other committees. Instead, his appointment secretary James Killan, heard their pleas for reconsideration of the State fallout shelter building program and for State action to remove strontium 90 from milk.

Killan treated the delegation cordially. However, Mrs. Eugene Belisle, New England chairman of the Voice of Women, said she was "very disappointed" that they could not meet the governor.

Among the demonstrators were 30 small children. One four-year-old boy carried a sign reading "I want to be a daddy some day." His white armband was cut from a diaper. The youngest demonstrator, aged 5 1/2 months, slept in his carriage most of the afternoon.

Several of the adult picketers carried signs with apocalyptic quotations from William Blake. Others simply had the word "peace" or "pax" on signs hung over their chests or backs. Only a handful of Harvard students and faculty members participated.

Just before the demonstration broke up with a march to the Park Street subway, Tony Marquez, a veteran opponent of disarmament groups, passed out literature criticizing their proposals.

Meanwhile, Tocsin distributed about 150 blue armbands at Harvard and Radcliffe yesterday. Robert A. Sable '63, chairman of the project, called the response "fair."

about 120 more demonstrators left Cambridge by bus at 10:15 last night.

Killan treated the delegation cordially. However, Mrs. Eugene Belisle, New England chairman of the Voice of Women, said she was "very disappointed" that they could not meet the governor.

Among the demonstrators were 30 small children. One four-year-old boy carried a sign reading "I want to be a daddy some day." His white armband was cut from a diaper. The youngest demonstrator, aged 5 1/2 months, slept in his carriage most of the afternoon.

Several of the adult picketers carried signs with apocalyptic quotations from William Blake. Others simply had the word "peace" or "pax" on signs hung over their chests or backs. Only a handful of Harvard students and faculty members participated.

Just before the demonstration broke up with a march to the Park Street subway, Tony Marquez, a veteran opponent of disarmament groups, passed out literature criticizing their proposals.

Meanwhile, Tocsin distributed about 150 blue armbands at Harvard and Radcliffe yesterday. Robert A. Sable '63, chairman of the project, called the response "fair."

about 120 more demonstrators left Cambridge by bus at 10:15 last night.

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