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Van Bilsen Sees Need for Growth in Congo

By Ronald J. Greene

ly immediate and rapid economic development programs will save the Congo from a new outbreak of hostilities, A. Van Bilsen, a former Belgian advisor to Congolese President Joseph bu, declared last night.

The most dangerous thing in the would be to try to maintain the status quo,' 'he said, warning the United States to avoid making the Congo a South Vietnam."

Van Bilsen maintained that "intense" economic development under Belgian had "radicalized" the Congolese . "The Congo must move rapidly because it cannot move slowly. . . . The people demand change. If it cannot find to move ahead, one can predict revolution," he declared.

He commended the U.N. effort in the Congo as an "outstanding and exciting ," but warned of the difficulties of aministering an aid program from inside a country.

Van Bilsen may get the opportunity to participate in such an aid project soon, reportedly will assume an important post in the Belgian foreign aid administration when he returns to Brussels in April.

ing farewell last night at the Quinase Africa Forum, he told an audience of six that the chaos in the Congo caused by the intense desire of the ese for change, coupled with the trained leadership.

Van Bilsen admitted that the people nga were considerably less radical than other Congolese because of tribalism in rural areas and the alism of the Union Miniere. But he foresaw nationalism there soon.

The most dangerous thing in the would be to try to maintain the status quo,' 'he said, warning the United States to avoid making the Congo a South Vietnam."

Van Bilsen maintained that "intense" economic development under Belgian had "radicalized" the Congolese . "The Congo must move rapidly because it cannot move slowly. . . . The people demand change. If it cannot find to move ahead, one can predict revolution," he declared.

He commended the U.N. effort in the Congo as an "outstanding and exciting ," but warned of the difficulties of aministering an aid program from inside a country.

Van Bilsen may get the opportunity to participate in such an aid project soon, reportedly will assume an important post in the Belgian foreign aid administration when he returns to Brussels in April.

ing farewell last night at the Quinase Africa Forum, he told an audience of six that the chaos in the Congo caused by the intense desire of the ese for change, coupled with the trained leadership.

Van Bilsen admitted that the people nga were considerably less radical than other Congolese because of tribalism in rural areas and the alism of the Union Miniere. But he foresaw nationalism there soon.

Van Bilsen maintained that "intense" economic development under Belgian had "radicalized" the Congolese . "The Congo must move rapidly because it cannot move slowly. . . . The people demand change. If it cannot find to move ahead, one can predict revolution," he declared.

He commended the U.N. effort in the Congo as an "outstanding and exciting ," but warned of the difficulties of aministering an aid program from inside a country.

Van Bilsen may get the opportunity to participate in such an aid project soon, reportedly will assume an important post in the Belgian foreign aid administration when he returns to Brussels in April.

ing farewell last night at the Quinase Africa Forum, he told an audience of six that the chaos in the Congo caused by the intense desire of the ese for change, coupled with the trained leadership.

Van Bilsen admitted that the people nga were considerably less radical than other Congolese because of tribalism in rural areas and the alism of the Union Miniere. But he foresaw nationalism there soon.

He commended the U.N. effort in the Congo as an "outstanding and exciting ," but warned of the difficulties of aministering an aid program from inside a country.

Van Bilsen may get the opportunity to participate in such an aid project soon, reportedly will assume an important post in the Belgian foreign aid administration when he returns to Brussels in April.

ing farewell last night at the Quinase Africa Forum, he told an audience of six that the chaos in the Congo caused by the intense desire of the ese for change, coupled with the trained leadership.

Van Bilsen admitted that the people nga were considerably less radical than other Congolese because of tribalism in rural areas and the alism of the Union Miniere. But he foresaw nationalism there soon.

Van Bilsen may get the opportunity to participate in such an aid project soon, reportedly will assume an important post in the Belgian foreign aid administration when he returns to Brussels in April.

ing farewell last night at the Quinase Africa Forum, he told an audience of six that the chaos in the Congo caused by the intense desire of the ese for change, coupled with the trained leadership.

Van Bilsen admitted that the people nga were considerably less radical than other Congolese because of tribalism in rural areas and the alism of the Union Miniere. But he foresaw nationalism there soon.

ing farewell last night at the Quinase Africa Forum, he told an audience of six that the chaos in the Congo caused by the intense desire of the ese for change, coupled with the trained leadership.

Van Bilsen admitted that the people nga were considerably less radical than other Congolese because of tribalism in rural areas and the alism of the Union Miniere. But he foresaw nationalism there soon.

Van Bilsen admitted that the people nga were considerably less radical than other Congolese because of tribalism in rural areas and the alism of the Union Miniere. But he foresaw nationalism there soon.

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