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Winless Peabody Calls On 'Decent' Mass. Voters

of an Election: I

By Lawrence W. Feinberg

Endicott "Chub" Peabody '42 is the man's candidate for governor. Average, decent voters of Massachusetts are fed up with the problem subscription," he said recently. "They lean, decent candidates for office levels."

Peabody has been presenting himself clean and decent that even the citizen should not flinch for him in September's Democratic primary and, hopefully, in the gubernatorial election against incumbent Republican John A. Volpe.

the party professionals, whose he is courting for the Democratic Dominating convention at Spring- 7-9, Peabody makes another "I'm getting delegate votes," he , "because they feel I'm the can win for the Democratic November."

Scandals Hurt Party

Democrats, badly divided by rival and stained by spectacular scan- need a candidate not with either factions or scan-Peabody reasons. He fills both perfectly.

eight years of generally politicking around Massachusetts Peabody has remained independent working seriously for only one candidate, John F. Kennedy '40, met at Harvard. The President a loner in Massachusetts very lack of success has him on the corruption issue. In campaigns he has won only once--a term on the Governor's Council.

Losing has kept Peabody on lines while other more successful politicians have gotten their dirty.

Reputation for Honesty

as also gained a reputation for honesty from his family back which he mentions frequently. is the son of an Episcopalian and grandson of the founder and of Groton Academy.

Peabody speaks "voting for one of our own," background undoubtedly counts with many voters and politicians. least a generation the Democratic Massachusetts has been Irish and Italians, while run mostly Yankees. So far, attempts to break this pattern . He lost to Edward for attorney general in 1956

Foster Furcolo and Joseph D. governor in 1958 and 1960. But 1960 race he ran a close second in the Democratic primary, a distinctly amateurish campaign. this time some observers feel has a better chance of winning, Edward F. McLaughlin is still the front-runner for the party endorsement.

"Wheelers and Dealers"

Peabody has reinforced the principal of his campaign against corruption by proposing a major strengthening of the governor's office "to meet the root of the problem." Because Massachusetts governor's office which is among the weakest in the nation, "wheelers and "have created "one of the biggest anywhere," Peabody argues.

As a remedy, he suggests lengthening the Governor's term to four years from the present two. Peabody's plan would give the governor power to appoint all level state officials--except the general--who are now elected, let the governor appoint his heads upon taking office, forcing him to work through the of his predecessors until their expire.

Peabody also wants to abolish the Governor's Council, which presently must approve nearly every action the governor takes. This venerable institution, established in the 18th century, was devised by the colonists to restrict the authority of royal governors.

Peabody's reputation has been tarnished somewhat by the discovery that a "private" poll sent out by his office to delegates to the Democratic Convention was elaborately coded to indicate the identity of respondents, despite a promise of anonymity. He says that the poll was handled by a private polling organization and that "I had no knowledge that coding was taking place."

Burns Ballots

When the coding was uncovered, Peabody immediately fired the pollsters and had the ballots burned at the Shawmut National Bank. The incident occurred, he says, because of "lack of clearance and control" by his campaign organization.

After corruption, the only other important campaign issue is financing an increase in state services. Peabody contends that local communities in Massachusetts, which have the highest real estate taxes in the nation, "have been abandoned by the state." They need additional state assistance, he says, for transportation, health, and education programs. But the state needs new sources of revenue.

Peabody personally favors graduated state income tax weighs least heavily on person low incomes." However, as Governor, he says he would be to accept a limited sales tax. "The Important thing," he notes, "is to help the communities; then, we can decide which way it is to be done."

He charges that Volpe has and equivocated" on the tax "retreated and retreated until on cities and towns have Volpe's "vacillation" on taxes body's prime illustration of that under Volpe "Massachusetts has been leaderless."

Peabody's own experience in comes largely from running in campaigns. He has never stopped campaigning since 1960 and did his down town Boston campaign quarters after the last election ever, he has also found time to his law practice which he operates from a Beacon Hill town house.

Peabody's Daring Deeds

Peabody graduated from Harvard School in 1948 after three years submarine service of the campaign newspaper, the "Peabody Bandwagon," relates his war records times his submarine surfaced ing parties, led by Peabody, to the enemy's vessels and engaged in hand-to-hand combat. For his deeds...Peabody was personally decorated by Secretary of the Navy Forrestal with the Silver Star."

As an undergraduate living House, Peabody ranked around the middle of his class. guard on the varsity football team for three seasons. Named to every All-American team in 1941, he still remains Harvard's last All-American. This fact was mentioned in almost every news written about him. The "Peabody Bandwagon" adds: "He raised his weight from 165 to 195 pounds and added an inch and a half to his neck measurement with exercises which included standing on his head for long periods of time."

With a stream of publicity and extensive speechmaking state, Peabody is pressing his in what he considers "my year." my record indicates that I love campaigning," he says. It seems aged and tired him some but not to stop him from coming back for more

the party professionals, whose he is courting for the Democratic Dominating convention at Spring- 7-9, Peabody makes another "I'm getting delegate votes," he , "because they feel I'm the can win for the Democratic November."

Scandals Hurt Party

Democrats, badly divided by rival and stained by spectacular scan- need a candidate not with either factions or scan-Peabody reasons. He fills both perfectly.

eight years of generally politicking around Massachusetts Peabody has remained independent working seriously for only one candidate, John F. Kennedy '40, met at Harvard. The President a loner in Massachusetts very lack of success has him on the corruption issue. In campaigns he has won only once--a term on the Governor's Council.

Losing has kept Peabody on lines while other more successful politicians have gotten their dirty.

Reputation for Honesty

as also gained a reputation for honesty from his family back which he mentions frequently. is the son of an Episcopalian and grandson of the founder and of Groton Academy.

Peabody speaks "voting for one of our own," background undoubtedly counts with many voters and politicians. least a generation the Democratic Massachusetts has been Irish and Italians, while run mostly Yankees. So far, attempts to break this pattern . He lost to Edward for attorney general in 1956

Foster Furcolo and Joseph D. governor in 1958 and 1960. But 1960 race he ran a close second in the Democratic primary, a distinctly amateurish campaign. this time some observers feel has a better chance of winning, Edward F. McLaughlin is still the front-runner for the party endorsement.

"Wheelers and Dealers"

Peabody has reinforced the principal of his campaign against corruption by proposing a major strengthening of the governor's office "to meet the root of the problem." Because Massachusetts governor's office which is among the weakest in the nation, "wheelers and "have created "one of the biggest anywhere," Peabody argues.

As a remedy, he suggests lengthening the Governor's term to four years from the present two. Peabody's plan would give the governor power to appoint all level state officials--except the general--who are now elected, let the governor appoint his heads upon taking office, forcing him to work through the of his predecessors until their expire.

Peabody also wants to abolish the Governor's Council, which presently must approve nearly every action the governor takes. This venerable institution, established in the 18th century, was devised by the colonists to restrict the authority of royal governors.

Peabody's reputation has been tarnished somewhat by the discovery that a "private" poll sent out by his office to delegates to the Democratic Convention was elaborately coded to indicate the identity of respondents, despite a promise of anonymity. He says that the poll was handled by a private polling organization and that "I had no knowledge that coding was taking place."

Burns Ballots

When the coding was uncovered, Peabody immediately fired the pollsters and had the ballots burned at the Shawmut National Bank. The incident occurred, he says, because of "lack of clearance and control" by his campaign organization.

After corruption, the only other important campaign issue is financing an increase in state services. Peabody contends that local communities in Massachusetts, which have the highest real estate taxes in the nation, "have been abandoned by the state." They need additional state assistance, he says, for transportation, health, and education programs. But the state needs new sources of revenue.

Peabody personally favors graduated state income tax weighs least heavily on person low incomes." However, as Governor, he says he would be to accept a limited sales tax. "The Important thing," he notes, "is to help the communities; then, we can decide which way it is to be done."

He charges that Volpe has and equivocated" on the tax "retreated and retreated until on cities and towns have Volpe's "vacillation" on taxes body's prime illustration of that under Volpe "Massachusetts has been leaderless."

Peabody's own experience in comes largely from running in campaigns. He has never stopped campaigning since 1960 and did his down town Boston campaign quarters after the last election ever, he has also found time to his law practice which he operates from a Beacon Hill town house.

Peabody's Daring Deeds

Peabody graduated from Harvard School in 1948 after three years submarine service of the campaign newspaper, the "Peabody Bandwagon," relates his war records times his submarine surfaced ing parties, led by Peabody, to the enemy's vessels and engaged in hand-to-hand combat. For his deeds...Peabody was personally decorated by Secretary of the Navy Forrestal with the Silver Star."

As an undergraduate living House, Peabody ranked around the middle of his class. guard on the varsity football team for three seasons. Named to every All-American team in 1941, he still remains Harvard's last All-American. This fact was mentioned in almost every news written about him. The "Peabody Bandwagon" adds: "He raised his weight from 165 to 195 pounds and added an inch and a half to his neck measurement with exercises which included standing on his head for long periods of time."

With a stream of publicity and extensive speechmaking state, Peabody is pressing his in what he considers "my year." my record indicates that I love campaigning," he says. It seems aged and tired him some but not to stop him from coming back for more

Scandals Hurt Party

Democrats, badly divided by rival and stained by spectacular scan- need a candidate not with either factions or scan-Peabody reasons. He fills both perfectly.

eight years of generally politicking around Massachusetts Peabody has remained independent working seriously for only one candidate, John F. Kennedy '40, met at Harvard. The President a loner in Massachusetts very lack of success has him on the corruption issue. In campaigns he has won only once--a term on the Governor's Council.

Losing has kept Peabody on lines while other more successful politicians have gotten their dirty.

Reputation for Honesty

as also gained a reputation for honesty from his family back which he mentions frequently. is the son of an Episcopalian and grandson of the founder and of Groton Academy.

Peabody speaks "voting for one of our own," background undoubtedly counts with many voters and politicians. least a generation the Democratic Massachusetts has been Irish and Italians, while run mostly Yankees. So far, attempts to break this pattern . He lost to Edward for attorney general in 1956

Foster Furcolo and Joseph D. governor in 1958 and 1960. But 1960 race he ran a close second in the Democratic primary, a distinctly amateurish campaign. this time some observers feel has a better chance of winning, Edward F. McLaughlin is still the front-runner for the party endorsement.

"Wheelers and Dealers"

Peabody has reinforced the principal of his campaign against corruption by proposing a major strengthening of the governor's office "to meet the root of the problem." Because Massachusetts governor's office which is among the weakest in the nation, "wheelers and "have created "one of the biggest anywhere," Peabody argues.

As a remedy, he suggests lengthening the Governor's term to four years from the present two. Peabody's plan would give the governor power to appoint all level state officials--except the general--who are now elected, let the governor appoint his heads upon taking office, forcing him to work through the of his predecessors until their expire.

Peabody also wants to abolish the Governor's Council, which presently must approve nearly every action the governor takes. This venerable institution, established in the 18th century, was devised by the colonists to restrict the authority of royal governors.

Peabody's reputation has been tarnished somewhat by the discovery that a "private" poll sent out by his office to delegates to the Democratic Convention was elaborately coded to indicate the identity of respondents, despite a promise of anonymity. He says that the poll was handled by a private polling organization and that "I had no knowledge that coding was taking place."

Burns Ballots

When the coding was uncovered, Peabody immediately fired the pollsters and had the ballots burned at the Shawmut National Bank. The incident occurred, he says, because of "lack of clearance and control" by his campaign organization.

After corruption, the only other important campaign issue is financing an increase in state services. Peabody contends that local communities in Massachusetts, which have the highest real estate taxes in the nation, "have been abandoned by the state." They need additional state assistance, he says, for transportation, health, and education programs. But the state needs new sources of revenue.

Peabody personally favors graduated state income tax weighs least heavily on person low incomes." However, as Governor, he says he would be to accept a limited sales tax. "The Important thing," he notes, "is to help the communities; then, we can decide which way it is to be done."

He charges that Volpe has and equivocated" on the tax "retreated and retreated until on cities and towns have Volpe's "vacillation" on taxes body's prime illustration of that under Volpe "Massachusetts has been leaderless."

Peabody's own experience in comes largely from running in campaigns. He has never stopped campaigning since 1960 and did his down town Boston campaign quarters after the last election ever, he has also found time to his law practice which he operates from a Beacon Hill town house.

Peabody's Daring Deeds

Peabody graduated from Harvard School in 1948 after three years submarine service of the campaign newspaper, the "Peabody Bandwagon," relates his war records times his submarine surfaced ing parties, led by Peabody, to the enemy's vessels and engaged in hand-to-hand combat. For his deeds...Peabody was personally decorated by Secretary of the Navy Forrestal with the Silver Star."

As an undergraduate living House, Peabody ranked around the middle of his class. guard on the varsity football team for three seasons. Named to every All-American team in 1941, he still remains Harvard's last All-American. This fact was mentioned in almost every news written about him. The "Peabody Bandwagon" adds: "He raised his weight from 165 to 195 pounds and added an inch and a half to his neck measurement with exercises which included standing on his head for long periods of time."

With a stream of publicity and extensive speechmaking state, Peabody is pressing his in what he considers "my year." my record indicates that I love campaigning," he says. It seems aged and tired him some but not to stop him from coming back for more

eight years of generally politicking around Massachusetts Peabody has remained independent working seriously for only one candidate, John F. Kennedy '40, met at Harvard. The President a loner in Massachusetts very lack of success has him on the corruption issue. In campaigns he has won only once--a term on the Governor's Council.

Losing has kept Peabody on lines while other more successful politicians have gotten their dirty.

Reputation for Honesty

as also gained a reputation for honesty from his family back which he mentions frequently. is the son of an Episcopalian and grandson of the founder and of Groton Academy.

Peabody speaks "voting for one of our own," background undoubtedly counts with many voters and politicians. least a generation the Democratic Massachusetts has been Irish and Italians, while run mostly Yankees. So far, attempts to break this pattern . He lost to Edward for attorney general in 1956

Foster Furcolo and Joseph D. governor in 1958 and 1960. But 1960 race he ran a close second in the Democratic primary, a distinctly amateurish campaign. this time some observers feel has a better chance of winning, Edward F. McLaughlin is still the front-runner for the party endorsement.

"Wheelers and Dealers"

Peabody has reinforced the principal of his campaign against corruption by proposing a major strengthening of the governor's office "to meet the root of the problem." Because Massachusetts governor's office which is among the weakest in the nation, "wheelers and "have created "one of the biggest anywhere," Peabody argues.

As a remedy, he suggests lengthening the Governor's term to four years from the present two. Peabody's plan would give the governor power to appoint all level state officials--except the general--who are now elected, let the governor appoint his heads upon taking office, forcing him to work through the of his predecessors until their expire.

Peabody also wants to abolish the Governor's Council, which presently must approve nearly every action the governor takes. This venerable institution, established in the 18th century, was devised by the colonists to restrict the authority of royal governors.

Peabody's reputation has been tarnished somewhat by the discovery that a "private" poll sent out by his office to delegates to the Democratic Convention was elaborately coded to indicate the identity of respondents, despite a promise of anonymity. He says that the poll was handled by a private polling organization and that "I had no knowledge that coding was taking place."

Burns Ballots

When the coding was uncovered, Peabody immediately fired the pollsters and had the ballots burned at the Shawmut National Bank. The incident occurred, he says, because of "lack of clearance and control" by his campaign organization.

After corruption, the only other important campaign issue is financing an increase in state services. Peabody contends that local communities in Massachusetts, which have the highest real estate taxes in the nation, "have been abandoned by the state." They need additional state assistance, he says, for transportation, health, and education programs. But the state needs new sources of revenue.

Peabody personally favors graduated state income tax weighs least heavily on person low incomes." However, as Governor, he says he would be to accept a limited sales tax. "The Important thing," he notes, "is to help the communities; then, we can decide which way it is to be done."

He charges that Volpe has and equivocated" on the tax "retreated and retreated until on cities and towns have Volpe's "vacillation" on taxes body's prime illustration of that under Volpe "Massachusetts has been leaderless."

Peabody's own experience in comes largely from running in campaigns. He has never stopped campaigning since 1960 and did his down town Boston campaign quarters after the last election ever, he has also found time to his law practice which he operates from a Beacon Hill town house.

Peabody's Daring Deeds

Peabody graduated from Harvard School in 1948 after three years submarine service of the campaign newspaper, the "Peabody Bandwagon," relates his war records times his submarine surfaced ing parties, led by Peabody, to the enemy's vessels and engaged in hand-to-hand combat. For his deeds...Peabody was personally decorated by Secretary of the Navy Forrestal with the Silver Star."

As an undergraduate living House, Peabody ranked around the middle of his class. guard on the varsity football team for three seasons. Named to every All-American team in 1941, he still remains Harvard's last All-American. This fact was mentioned in almost every news written about him. The "Peabody Bandwagon" adds: "He raised his weight from 165 to 195 pounds and added an inch and a half to his neck measurement with exercises which included standing on his head for long periods of time."

With a stream of publicity and extensive speechmaking state, Peabody is pressing his in what he considers "my year." my record indicates that I love campaigning," he says. It seems aged and tired him some but not to stop him from coming back for more

Losing has kept Peabody on lines while other more successful politicians have gotten their dirty.

Reputation for Honesty

as also gained a reputation for honesty from his family back which he mentions frequently. is the son of an Episcopalian and grandson of the founder and of Groton Academy.

Peabody speaks "voting for one of our own," background undoubtedly counts with many voters and politicians. least a generation the Democratic Massachusetts has been Irish and Italians, while run mostly Yankees. So far, attempts to break this pattern . He lost to Edward for attorney general in 1956

Foster Furcolo and Joseph D. governor in 1958 and 1960. But 1960 race he ran a close second in the Democratic primary, a distinctly amateurish campaign. this time some observers feel has a better chance of winning, Edward F. McLaughlin is still the front-runner for the party endorsement.

"Wheelers and Dealers"

Peabody has reinforced the principal of his campaign against corruption by proposing a major strengthening of the governor's office "to meet the root of the problem." Because Massachusetts governor's office which is among the weakest in the nation, "wheelers and "have created "one of the biggest anywhere," Peabody argues.

As a remedy, he suggests lengthening the Governor's term to four years from the present two. Peabody's plan would give the governor power to appoint all level state officials--except the general--who are now elected, let the governor appoint his heads upon taking office, forcing him to work through the of his predecessors until their expire.

Peabody also wants to abolish the Governor's Council, which presently must approve nearly every action the governor takes. This venerable institution, established in the 18th century, was devised by the colonists to restrict the authority of royal governors.

Peabody's reputation has been tarnished somewhat by the discovery that a "private" poll sent out by his office to delegates to the Democratic Convention was elaborately coded to indicate the identity of respondents, despite a promise of anonymity. He says that the poll was handled by a private polling organization and that "I had no knowledge that coding was taking place."

Burns Ballots

When the coding was uncovered, Peabody immediately fired the pollsters and had the ballots burned at the Shawmut National Bank. The incident occurred, he says, because of "lack of clearance and control" by his campaign organization.

After corruption, the only other important campaign issue is financing an increase in state services. Peabody contends that local communities in Massachusetts, which have the highest real estate taxes in the nation, "have been abandoned by the state." They need additional state assistance, he says, for transportation, health, and education programs. But the state needs new sources of revenue.

Peabody personally favors graduated state income tax weighs least heavily on person low incomes." However, as Governor, he says he would be to accept a limited sales tax. "The Important thing," he notes, "is to help the communities; then, we can decide which way it is to be done."

He charges that Volpe has and equivocated" on the tax "retreated and retreated until on cities and towns have Volpe's "vacillation" on taxes body's prime illustration of that under Volpe "Massachusetts has been leaderless."

Peabody's own experience in comes largely from running in campaigns. He has never stopped campaigning since 1960 and did his down town Boston campaign quarters after the last election ever, he has also found time to his law practice which he operates from a Beacon Hill town house.

Peabody's Daring Deeds

Peabody graduated from Harvard School in 1948 after three years submarine service of the campaign newspaper, the "Peabody Bandwagon," relates his war records times his submarine surfaced ing parties, led by Peabody, to the enemy's vessels and engaged in hand-to-hand combat. For his deeds...Peabody was personally decorated by Secretary of the Navy Forrestal with the Silver Star."

As an undergraduate living House, Peabody ranked around the middle of his class. guard on the varsity football team for three seasons. Named to every All-American team in 1941, he still remains Harvard's last All-American. This fact was mentioned in almost every news written about him. The "Peabody Bandwagon" adds: "He raised his weight from 165 to 195 pounds and added an inch and a half to his neck measurement with exercises which included standing on his head for long periods of time."

With a stream of publicity and extensive speechmaking state, Peabody is pressing his in what he considers "my year." my record indicates that I love campaigning," he says. It seems aged and tired him some but not to stop him from coming back for more

Reputation for Honesty

as also gained a reputation for honesty from his family back which he mentions frequently. is the son of an Episcopalian and grandson of the founder and of Groton Academy.

Peabody speaks "voting for one of our own," background undoubtedly counts with many voters and politicians. least a generation the Democratic Massachusetts has been Irish and Italians, while run mostly Yankees. So far, attempts to break this pattern . He lost to Edward for attorney general in 1956

Foster Furcolo and Joseph D. governor in 1958 and 1960. But 1960 race he ran a close second in the Democratic primary, a distinctly amateurish campaign. this time some observers feel has a better chance of winning, Edward F. McLaughlin is still the front-runner for the party endorsement.

"Wheelers and Dealers"

Peabody has reinforced the principal of his campaign against corruption by proposing a major strengthening of the governor's office "to meet the root of the problem." Because Massachusetts governor's office which is among the weakest in the nation, "wheelers and "have created "one of the biggest anywhere," Peabody argues.

As a remedy, he suggests lengthening the Governor's term to four years from the present two. Peabody's plan would give the governor power to appoint all level state officials--except the general--who are now elected, let the governor appoint his heads upon taking office, forcing him to work through the of his predecessors until their expire.

Peabody also wants to abolish the Governor's Council, which presently must approve nearly every action the governor takes. This venerable institution, established in the 18th century, was devised by the colonists to restrict the authority of royal governors.

Peabody's reputation has been tarnished somewhat by the discovery that a "private" poll sent out by his office to delegates to the Democratic Convention was elaborately coded to indicate the identity of respondents, despite a promise of anonymity. He says that the poll was handled by a private polling organization and that "I had no knowledge that coding was taking place."

Burns Ballots

When the coding was uncovered, Peabody immediately fired the pollsters and had the ballots burned at the Shawmut National Bank. The incident occurred, he says, because of "lack of clearance and control" by his campaign organization.

After corruption, the only other important campaign issue is financing an increase in state services. Peabody contends that local communities in Massachusetts, which have the highest real estate taxes in the nation, "have been abandoned by the state." They need additional state assistance, he says, for transportation, health, and education programs. But the state needs new sources of revenue.

Peabody personally favors graduated state income tax weighs least heavily on person low incomes." However, as Governor, he says he would be to accept a limited sales tax. "The Important thing," he notes, "is to help the communities; then, we can decide which way it is to be done."

He charges that Volpe has and equivocated" on the tax "retreated and retreated until on cities and towns have Volpe's "vacillation" on taxes body's prime illustration of that under Volpe "Massachusetts has been leaderless."

Peabody's own experience in comes largely from running in campaigns. He has never stopped campaigning since 1960 and did his down town Boston campaign quarters after the last election ever, he has also found time to his law practice which he operates from a Beacon Hill town house.

Peabody's Daring Deeds

Peabody graduated from Harvard School in 1948 after three years submarine service of the campaign newspaper, the "Peabody Bandwagon," relates his war records times his submarine surfaced ing parties, led by Peabody, to the enemy's vessels and engaged in hand-to-hand combat. For his deeds...Peabody was personally decorated by Secretary of the Navy Forrestal with the Silver Star."

As an undergraduate living House, Peabody ranked around the middle of his class. guard on the varsity football team for three seasons. Named to every All-American team in 1941, he still remains Harvard's last All-American. This fact was mentioned in almost every news written about him. The "Peabody Bandwagon" adds: "He raised his weight from 165 to 195 pounds and added an inch and a half to his neck measurement with exercises which included standing on his head for long periods of time."

With a stream of publicity and extensive speechmaking state, Peabody is pressing his in what he considers "my year." my record indicates that I love campaigning," he says. It seems aged and tired him some but not to stop him from coming back for more

Peabody speaks "voting for one of our own," background undoubtedly counts with many voters and politicians. least a generation the Democratic Massachusetts has been Irish and Italians, while run mostly Yankees. So far, attempts to break this pattern . He lost to Edward for attorney general in 1956

Foster Furcolo and Joseph D. governor in 1958 and 1960. But 1960 race he ran a close second in the Democratic primary, a distinctly amateurish campaign. this time some observers feel has a better chance of winning, Edward F. McLaughlin is still the front-runner for the party endorsement.

"Wheelers and Dealers"

Peabody has reinforced the principal of his campaign against corruption by proposing a major strengthening of the governor's office "to meet the root of the problem." Because Massachusetts governor's office which is among the weakest in the nation, "wheelers and "have created "one of the biggest anywhere," Peabody argues.

As a remedy, he suggests lengthening the Governor's term to four years from the present two. Peabody's plan would give the governor power to appoint all level state officials--except the general--who are now elected, let the governor appoint his heads upon taking office, forcing him to work through the of his predecessors until their expire.

Peabody also wants to abolish the Governor's Council, which presently must approve nearly every action the governor takes. This venerable institution, established in the 18th century, was devised by the colonists to restrict the authority of royal governors.

Peabody's reputation has been tarnished somewhat by the discovery that a "private" poll sent out by his office to delegates to the Democratic Convention was elaborately coded to indicate the identity of respondents, despite a promise of anonymity. He says that the poll was handled by a private polling organization and that "I had no knowledge that coding was taking place."

Burns Ballots

When the coding was uncovered, Peabody immediately fired the pollsters and had the ballots burned at the Shawmut National Bank. The incident occurred, he says, because of "lack of clearance and control" by his campaign organization.

After corruption, the only other important campaign issue is financing an increase in state services. Peabody contends that local communities in Massachusetts, which have the highest real estate taxes in the nation, "have been abandoned by the state." They need additional state assistance, he says, for transportation, health, and education programs. But the state needs new sources of revenue.

Peabody personally favors graduated state income tax weighs least heavily on person low incomes." However, as Governor, he says he would be to accept a limited sales tax. "The Important thing," he notes, "is to help the communities; then, we can decide which way it is to be done."

He charges that Volpe has and equivocated" on the tax "retreated and retreated until on cities and towns have Volpe's "vacillation" on taxes body's prime illustration of that under Volpe "Massachusetts has been leaderless."

Peabody's own experience in comes largely from running in campaigns. He has never stopped campaigning since 1960 and did his down town Boston campaign quarters after the last election ever, he has also found time to his law practice which he operates from a Beacon Hill town house.

Peabody's Daring Deeds

Peabody graduated from Harvard School in 1948 after three years submarine service of the campaign newspaper, the "Peabody Bandwagon," relates his war records times his submarine surfaced ing parties, led by Peabody, to the enemy's vessels and engaged in hand-to-hand combat. For his deeds...Peabody was personally decorated by Secretary of the Navy Forrestal with the Silver Star."

As an undergraduate living House, Peabody ranked around the middle of his class. guard on the varsity football team for three seasons. Named to every All-American team in 1941, he still remains Harvard's last All-American. This fact was mentioned in almost every news written about him. The "Peabody Bandwagon" adds: "He raised his weight from 165 to 195 pounds and added an inch and a half to his neck measurement with exercises which included standing on his head for long periods of time."

With a stream of publicity and extensive speechmaking state, Peabody is pressing his in what he considers "my year." my record indicates that I love campaigning," he says. It seems aged and tired him some but not to stop him from coming back for more

Foster Furcolo and Joseph D. governor in 1958 and 1960. But 1960 race he ran a close second in the Democratic primary, a distinctly amateurish campaign. this time some observers feel has a better chance of winning, Edward F. McLaughlin is still the front-runner for the party endorsement.

"Wheelers and Dealers"

Peabody has reinforced the principal of his campaign against corruption by proposing a major strengthening of the governor's office "to meet the root of the problem." Because Massachusetts governor's office which is among the weakest in the nation, "wheelers and "have created "one of the biggest anywhere," Peabody argues.

As a remedy, he suggests lengthening the Governor's term to four years from the present two. Peabody's plan would give the governor power to appoint all level state officials--except the general--who are now elected, let the governor appoint his heads upon taking office, forcing him to work through the of his predecessors until their expire.

Peabody also wants to abolish the Governor's Council, which presently must approve nearly every action the governor takes. This venerable institution, established in the 18th century, was devised by the colonists to restrict the authority of royal governors.

Peabody's reputation has been tarnished somewhat by the discovery that a "private" poll sent out by his office to delegates to the Democratic Convention was elaborately coded to indicate the identity of respondents, despite a promise of anonymity. He says that the poll was handled by a private polling organization and that "I had no knowledge that coding was taking place."

Burns Ballots

When the coding was uncovered, Peabody immediately fired the pollsters and had the ballots burned at the Shawmut National Bank. The incident occurred, he says, because of "lack of clearance and control" by his campaign organization.

After corruption, the only other important campaign issue is financing an increase in state services. Peabody contends that local communities in Massachusetts, which have the highest real estate taxes in the nation, "have been abandoned by the state." They need additional state assistance, he says, for transportation, health, and education programs. But the state needs new sources of revenue.

Peabody personally favors graduated state income tax weighs least heavily on person low incomes." However, as Governor, he says he would be to accept a limited sales tax. "The Important thing," he notes, "is to help the communities; then, we can decide which way it is to be done."

He charges that Volpe has and equivocated" on the tax "retreated and retreated until on cities and towns have Volpe's "vacillation" on taxes body's prime illustration of that under Volpe "Massachusetts has been leaderless."

Peabody's own experience in comes largely from running in campaigns. He has never stopped campaigning since 1960 and did his down town Boston campaign quarters after the last election ever, he has also found time to his law practice which he operates from a Beacon Hill town house.

Peabody's Daring Deeds

Peabody graduated from Harvard School in 1948 after three years submarine service of the campaign newspaper, the "Peabody Bandwagon," relates his war records times his submarine surfaced ing parties, led by Peabody, to the enemy's vessels and engaged in hand-to-hand combat. For his deeds...Peabody was personally decorated by Secretary of the Navy Forrestal with the Silver Star."

As an undergraduate living House, Peabody ranked around the middle of his class. guard on the varsity football team for three seasons. Named to every All-American team in 1941, he still remains Harvard's last All-American. This fact was mentioned in almost every news written about him. The "Peabody Bandwagon" adds: "He raised his weight from 165 to 195 pounds and added an inch and a half to his neck measurement with exercises which included standing on his head for long periods of time."

With a stream of publicity and extensive speechmaking state, Peabody is pressing his in what he considers "my year." my record indicates that I love campaigning," he says. It seems aged and tired him some but not to stop him from coming back for more

"Wheelers and Dealers"

Peabody has reinforced the principal of his campaign against corruption by proposing a major strengthening of the governor's office "to meet the root of the problem." Because Massachusetts governor's office which is among the weakest in the nation, "wheelers and "have created "one of the biggest anywhere," Peabody argues.

As a remedy, he suggests lengthening the Governor's term to four years from the present two. Peabody's plan would give the governor power to appoint all level state officials--except the general--who are now elected, let the governor appoint his heads upon taking office, forcing him to work through the of his predecessors until their expire.

Peabody also wants to abolish the Governor's Council, which presently must approve nearly every action the governor takes. This venerable institution, established in the 18th century, was devised by the colonists to restrict the authority of royal governors.

Peabody's reputation has been tarnished somewhat by the discovery that a "private" poll sent out by his office to delegates to the Democratic Convention was elaborately coded to indicate the identity of respondents, despite a promise of anonymity. He says that the poll was handled by a private polling organization and that "I had no knowledge that coding was taking place."

Burns Ballots

When the coding was uncovered, Peabody immediately fired the pollsters and had the ballots burned at the Shawmut National Bank. The incident occurred, he says, because of "lack of clearance and control" by his campaign organization.

After corruption, the only other important campaign issue is financing an increase in state services. Peabody contends that local communities in Massachusetts, which have the highest real estate taxes in the nation, "have been abandoned by the state." They need additional state assistance, he says, for transportation, health, and education programs. But the state needs new sources of revenue.

Peabody personally favors graduated state income tax weighs least heavily on person low incomes." However, as Governor, he says he would be to accept a limited sales tax. "The Important thing," he notes, "is to help the communities; then, we can decide which way it is to be done."

He charges that Volpe has and equivocated" on the tax "retreated and retreated until on cities and towns have Volpe's "vacillation" on taxes body's prime illustration of that under Volpe "Massachusetts has been leaderless."

Peabody's own experience in comes largely from running in campaigns. He has never stopped campaigning since 1960 and did his down town Boston campaign quarters after the last election ever, he has also found time to his law practice which he operates from a Beacon Hill town house.

Peabody's Daring Deeds

Peabody graduated from Harvard School in 1948 after three years submarine service of the campaign newspaper, the "Peabody Bandwagon," relates his war records times his submarine surfaced ing parties, led by Peabody, to the enemy's vessels and engaged in hand-to-hand combat. For his deeds...Peabody was personally decorated by Secretary of the Navy Forrestal with the Silver Star."

As an undergraduate living House, Peabody ranked around the middle of his class. guard on the varsity football team for three seasons. Named to every All-American team in 1941, he still remains Harvard's last All-American. This fact was mentioned in almost every news written about him. The "Peabody Bandwagon" adds: "He raised his weight from 165 to 195 pounds and added an inch and a half to his neck measurement with exercises which included standing on his head for long periods of time."

With a stream of publicity and extensive speechmaking state, Peabody is pressing his in what he considers "my year." my record indicates that I love campaigning," he says. It seems aged and tired him some but not to stop him from coming back for more

As a remedy, he suggests lengthening the Governor's term to four years from the present two. Peabody's plan would give the governor power to appoint all level state officials--except the general--who are now elected, let the governor appoint his heads upon taking office, forcing him to work through the of his predecessors until their expire.

Peabody also wants to abolish the Governor's Council, which presently must approve nearly every action the governor takes. This venerable institution, established in the 18th century, was devised by the colonists to restrict the authority of royal governors.

Peabody's reputation has been tarnished somewhat by the discovery that a "private" poll sent out by his office to delegates to the Democratic Convention was elaborately coded to indicate the identity of respondents, despite a promise of anonymity. He says that the poll was handled by a private polling organization and that "I had no knowledge that coding was taking place."

Burns Ballots

When the coding was uncovered, Peabody immediately fired the pollsters and had the ballots burned at the Shawmut National Bank. The incident occurred, he says, because of "lack of clearance and control" by his campaign organization.

After corruption, the only other important campaign issue is financing an increase in state services. Peabody contends that local communities in Massachusetts, which have the highest real estate taxes in the nation, "have been abandoned by the state." They need additional state assistance, he says, for transportation, health, and education programs. But the state needs new sources of revenue.

Peabody personally favors graduated state income tax weighs least heavily on person low incomes." However, as Governor, he says he would be to accept a limited sales tax. "The Important thing," he notes, "is to help the communities; then, we can decide which way it is to be done."

He charges that Volpe has and equivocated" on the tax "retreated and retreated until on cities and towns have Volpe's "vacillation" on taxes body's prime illustration of that under Volpe "Massachusetts has been leaderless."

Peabody's own experience in comes largely from running in campaigns. He has never stopped campaigning since 1960 and did his down town Boston campaign quarters after the last election ever, he has also found time to his law practice which he operates from a Beacon Hill town house.

Peabody's Daring Deeds

Peabody graduated from Harvard School in 1948 after three years submarine service of the campaign newspaper, the "Peabody Bandwagon," relates his war records times his submarine surfaced ing parties, led by Peabody, to the enemy's vessels and engaged in hand-to-hand combat. For his deeds...Peabody was personally decorated by Secretary of the Navy Forrestal with the Silver Star."

As an undergraduate living House, Peabody ranked around the middle of his class. guard on the varsity football team for three seasons. Named to every All-American team in 1941, he still remains Harvard's last All-American. This fact was mentioned in almost every news written about him. The "Peabody Bandwagon" adds: "He raised his weight from 165 to 195 pounds and added an inch and a half to his neck measurement with exercises which included standing on his head for long periods of time."

With a stream of publicity and extensive speechmaking state, Peabody is pressing his in what he considers "my year." my record indicates that I love campaigning," he says. It seems aged and tired him some but not to stop him from coming back for more

Peabody also wants to abolish the Governor's Council, which presently must approve nearly every action the governor takes. This venerable institution, established in the 18th century, was devised by the colonists to restrict the authority of royal governors.

Peabody's reputation has been tarnished somewhat by the discovery that a "private" poll sent out by his office to delegates to the Democratic Convention was elaborately coded to indicate the identity of respondents, despite a promise of anonymity. He says that the poll was handled by a private polling organization and that "I had no knowledge that coding was taking place."

Burns Ballots

When the coding was uncovered, Peabody immediately fired the pollsters and had the ballots burned at the Shawmut National Bank. The incident occurred, he says, because of "lack of clearance and control" by his campaign organization.

After corruption, the only other important campaign issue is financing an increase in state services. Peabody contends that local communities in Massachusetts, which have the highest real estate taxes in the nation, "have been abandoned by the state." They need additional state assistance, he says, for transportation, health, and education programs. But the state needs new sources of revenue.

Peabody personally favors graduated state income tax weighs least heavily on person low incomes." However, as Governor, he says he would be to accept a limited sales tax. "The Important thing," he notes, "is to help the communities; then, we can decide which way it is to be done."

He charges that Volpe has and equivocated" on the tax "retreated and retreated until on cities and towns have Volpe's "vacillation" on taxes body's prime illustration of that under Volpe "Massachusetts has been leaderless."

Peabody's own experience in comes largely from running in campaigns. He has never stopped campaigning since 1960 and did his down town Boston campaign quarters after the last election ever, he has also found time to his law practice which he operates from a Beacon Hill town house.

Peabody's Daring Deeds

Peabody graduated from Harvard School in 1948 after three years submarine service of the campaign newspaper, the "Peabody Bandwagon," relates his war records times his submarine surfaced ing parties, led by Peabody, to the enemy's vessels and engaged in hand-to-hand combat. For his deeds...Peabody was personally decorated by Secretary of the Navy Forrestal with the Silver Star."

As an undergraduate living House, Peabody ranked around the middle of his class. guard on the varsity football team for three seasons. Named to every All-American team in 1941, he still remains Harvard's last All-American. This fact was mentioned in almost every news written about him. The "Peabody Bandwagon" adds: "He raised his weight from 165 to 195 pounds and added an inch and a half to his neck measurement with exercises which included standing on his head for long periods of time."

With a stream of publicity and extensive speechmaking state, Peabody is pressing his in what he considers "my year." my record indicates that I love campaigning," he says. It seems aged and tired him some but not to stop him from coming back for more

He charges that Volpe has and equivocated" on the tax "retreated and retreated until on cities and towns have Volpe's "vacillation" on taxes body's prime illustration of that under Volpe "Massachusetts has been leaderless."

Peabody's own experience in comes largely from running in campaigns. He has never stopped campaigning since 1960 and did his down town Boston campaign quarters after the last election ever, he has also found time to his law practice which he operates from a Beacon Hill town house.

Peabody's Daring Deeds

Peabody graduated from Harvard School in 1948 after three years submarine service of the campaign newspaper, the "Peabody Bandwagon," relates his war records times his submarine surfaced ing parties, led by Peabody, to the enemy's vessels and engaged in hand-to-hand combat. For his deeds...Peabody was personally decorated by Secretary of the Navy Forrestal with the Silver Star."

As an undergraduate living House, Peabody ranked around the middle of his class. guard on the varsity football team for three seasons. Named to every All-American team in 1941, he still remains Harvard's last All-American. This fact was mentioned in almost every news written about him. The "Peabody Bandwagon" adds: "He raised his weight from 165 to 195 pounds and added an inch and a half to his neck measurement with exercises which included standing on his head for long periods of time."

With a stream of publicity and extensive speechmaking state, Peabody is pressing his in what he considers "my year." my record indicates that I love campaigning," he says. It seems aged and tired him some but not to stop him from coming back for more

Peabody's own experience in comes largely from running in campaigns. He has never stopped campaigning since 1960 and did his down town Boston campaign quarters after the last election ever, he has also found time to his law practice which he operates from a Beacon Hill town house.

Peabody's Daring Deeds

Peabody graduated from Harvard School in 1948 after three years submarine service of the campaign newspaper, the "Peabody Bandwagon," relates his war records times his submarine surfaced ing parties, led by Peabody, to the enemy's vessels and engaged in hand-to-hand combat. For his deeds...Peabody was personally decorated by Secretary of the Navy Forrestal with the Silver Star."

As an undergraduate living House, Peabody ranked around the middle of his class. guard on the varsity football team for three seasons. Named to every All-American team in 1941, he still remains Harvard's last All-American. This fact was mentioned in almost every news written about him. The "Peabody Bandwagon" adds: "He raised his weight from 165 to 195 pounds and added an inch and a half to his neck measurement with exercises which included standing on his head for long periods of time."

With a stream of publicity and extensive speechmaking state, Peabody is pressing his in what he considers "my year." my record indicates that I love campaigning," he says. It seems aged and tired him some but not to stop him from coming back for more

Peabody's Daring Deeds

Peabody graduated from Harvard School in 1948 after three years submarine service of the campaign newspaper, the "Peabody Bandwagon," relates his war records times his submarine surfaced ing parties, led by Peabody, to the enemy's vessels and engaged in hand-to-hand combat. For his deeds...Peabody was personally decorated by Secretary of the Navy Forrestal with the Silver Star."

As an undergraduate living House, Peabody ranked around the middle of his class. guard on the varsity football team for three seasons. Named to every All-American team in 1941, he still remains Harvard's last All-American. This fact was mentioned in almost every news written about him. The "Peabody Bandwagon" adds: "He raised his weight from 165 to 195 pounds and added an inch and a half to his neck measurement with exercises which included standing on his head for long periods of time."

With a stream of publicity and extensive speechmaking state, Peabody is pressing his in what he considers "my year." my record indicates that I love campaigning," he says. It seems aged and tired him some but not to stop him from coming back for more

As an undergraduate living House, Peabody ranked around the middle of his class. guard on the varsity football team for three seasons. Named to every All-American team in 1941, he still remains Harvard's last All-American. This fact was mentioned in almost every news written about him. The "Peabody Bandwagon" adds: "He raised his weight from 165 to 195 pounds and added an inch and a half to his neck measurement with exercises which included standing on his head for long periods of time."

With a stream of publicity and extensive speechmaking state, Peabody is pressing his in what he considers "my year." my record indicates that I love campaigning," he says. It seems aged and tired him some but not to stop him from coming back for more

With a stream of publicity and extensive speechmaking state, Peabody is pressing his in what he considers "my year." my record indicates that I love campaigning," he says. It seems aged and tired him some but not to stop him from coming back for more

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