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Geology Lab Set For Use in '63

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The University's new laboratory for research on the structure of minerals and rocks will be ready in 1963.

Costing $1 million, the David Hoffman memorial laboratory will rise on Oxford St. and connect with the geological wing of the University museum, with houses classrooms, the geology library, and one of the most extensive collections of rocks and minerals in the world.

The new laboratory will bring under one roof Harvard's large research program in geochemistry and geophysics, providing offices, workships, and laboratory space for senior Harvard geologists and some graduate students and postdoctoral students working in the accelerating field of experimental geology.

The five-story building, designed by the Architects. It will have double beams and partitions and utility arteries are flexible so that the size of offices, shops, and laboratories can be easily changed to accommodate different kinds of research. The top floor, to be left open but roofed, provides room for expansion.

Advanced teaching and research in the earth sciences at Harvard are now carried on in three separate buildings: the ROTC building, which houses laboratories for research in geochemistry and economic geology: the Dunbar laboratory, where geophysicists study rocks and materials under great heat and pressure; and the geological museum, which contains a laboratory for chemical analysis of sedimentary rocks, equipment for the study of stream flow and transportation of sediments, and the Berman Memorial Laboratory which has x-ray equipment for studying the composition and structure of minedals.

The five-story building, designed by the Architects. It will have double beams and partitions and utility arteries are flexible so that the size of offices, shops, and laboratories can be easily changed to accommodate different kinds of research. The top floor, to be left open but roofed, provides room for expansion.

Advanced teaching and research in the earth sciences at Harvard are now carried on in three separate buildings: the ROTC building, which houses laboratories for research in geochemistry and economic geology: the Dunbar laboratory, where geophysicists study rocks and materials under great heat and pressure; and the geological museum, which contains a laboratory for chemical analysis of sedimentary rocks, equipment for the study of stream flow and transportation of sediments, and the Berman Memorial Laboratory which has x-ray equipment for studying the composition and structure of minedals.

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