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Kleindienst to Stay in Cabinet; Five Top Aides Leave Posts

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Attorney General Richard G. Kleindienst '47 will remain in President Nixon's second-term cabinet despite major changes in the top ranks of the Justice Department, the White House announced Saturday.

In addition to the Kleindienst reappointment, White House press secretary Ronald L. Ziegler announced the retirement of Solicitor General Erwin N. Griswold and the departure of five top Justice Department aides.

Members of the Law School faculty yesterday declined to comment extensively on the Kleindienst retention. Lawrence H. Tribe '62, professor of Law, said that the move came as no surprise and that he would observe the Attorney General's performance "would have to be weighed" before he could make an informed judgment.

Paul A. Freund, Loeb University Professor, said that he will "have to wait and see" before making any comments on the Kleindienst re-appointment.

Griswold left his position as dean of the Law School to become Solicitor General in 1967. He was appointed by President Lyndon B. Johnson to succeed Thurgood Marshall, who then became the first black justice on the Supreme Court.

President Bok replaced Griswold as the dean of the Law School in 1968.

Griswold is expected to retire next spring, and will be succeeded by Robert H. Bork, a Yale Law School professor and anti-trust specialist. Griswold yesterday declined to comment on his future plans.

Ziegler announced the departure of the five top Justice Department aides as an indication that the President "wants the second term to be one full of new ideas" and to "make sure that no one becomes stale."

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