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SIN...the original exposes (the poster's word, not ours) what really happened in the Garden of Eden. According to Cornelia Ravenal's
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SIN...the original exposes (the poster's word, not ours) what really happened in the Garden of Eden. According to Cornelia Ravenal's '79 new musical, the first play by a Radcliffe undergraduate ever to be produced at the Loeb, the big dating service in the sky made a mistake with Adam and Eve. While Eve thinks she was sent to earth to meet her mate. Adam thinks he was promised a maid. With such a beginning, an irresistibly slimy serpent, and a chorus of nine animals misnamed by Adam, complications of course, develop. Set to Ravenal's jazz-rock music, the sometimes ironic, often humorous Sin does not exactly tell an original story, but it certainly looks at an old problem in a new way. Performances are tonight and tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday at 7 and 9 p.m. at the Loeb Experimental Theater. Free tickets are available at noon at the Loeb box office the day preceeding the performance.

The people who last year traded in a brand new car for a summa in an elite concentration in the Harvard version of "Let's Make a Deal" are back this weekend with Do It Yourself '77. With the stage designed to look like a bar, the old do it yourself troupe plus a few new additions will probably run through their new sketches like professionals doing a revue. The sketches range from one a la Raymond Chandler, to another that's a Viennese coffee song, to a T.V. situation tragedy written by Mark O'Donnell. Performances are tonight through Saturday at 11:30 p.m. and also Saturday at 8 in the Lowell JCR. Tickets are $1.

What's beneath the surface of human behavior is the theme of Collage: A Mime Show, being performed in two weekends at the Ex. In that undefined area between acting and dance, seven pieces by co-directors Kevin Grumback '78 and Elizabeth Pennel '79, each with a twist at the end, aim at presenting the audience with statements about how we view the human situation. In Jungle, the first piece, the apes come out from behind the bars, but it's the audience that ends up feeling caged; in Carnival the amusements turn the tables on those who are being amused. Performances of Mime, which promises to offer more than mere illusions are May 19-21 at 7:30 p.m. and also May 21 at 9 p.m. at the Loeb Ex. Tickets are available at noon at the Loeb box office the day preceeding the performance.

With chameleon ease, the citizens of Verona and Milan alternately declaim Elizabethan verse and belt out pop lyrics in this Guare-Shaprio adaptation of Shakespeare's Two Gentlemen of Verona. It's a good humored celebration of love, in which all's well since it ends well, despite a farcical dose of treachery.

John Manulis directs a spirited cast, whose dances and serenades sung with a touch of soul or a salsa lilt need the unlimited outdoor air to breath in. Performances are tonight and tomorrow at 8 pm, Saturday at 1:30 and 7:30 pm, in the Harvard YaRD. Tickets go for free at Holyoke Center.

Catch the re-runs of the age of Aquarius, more commonly known as Hair, presented by the Dunster Drama Society. The love-rock tribal musical promises energetic performances, rousing musical numbers, and even some piquant social and political commentary. Yes, Virginia, there once was an anti-war movement led by politically committed students. At Dunster House--May 12, 13, and 14

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