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Bee Registers With State

All-Female Social Club Holds Cocktail, Dance Parties

By Joshua W. Shenk, Crimson Staff Writers

Members of the all-female Bee Club registered with the state in January as a non-profit corporation and have held several parties on campus this spring.

Thursday night, the Bee rented space from The Crimson and held a cocktail and dance party in the newspaper's rental space at 14 Plympton St., according to Crimson President Julian E. Barnes '93.

Jazz musicians who played at the cocktail party were paid with a check imprinted "Bee Corp."

And about a month ago, the Bee held a catered affair at the Harvard Advocatebuilding at 21 South St.

Club members identified themselves to AdvocatePresident peter C.L. Nohrnberg '93 as a group of History and Literature concentrators. "But they paid under the Bee Club," Nohrenberg said.

But club members still refuse to acknowledge the existence of their club.

Kristin L. Silverberg '92, who is listed by the Massachusetts Secretary of State as president of "Bee Corp., refused comment yesterday.

In the past, current Bee President Honey East '93 has also refused to comment to The Crimson on the club. But East identified herself as the president of the Bee--"the first women's social club at Harvard"--in a resume submitted to a Jackson, Miss., beauty pageant, according to pageant director Dr. William H. Smith, in a March 9 interview.

East could not be reached for comment last night.

Sources familiar with the club said that members envisioned it as a social organization which emphasizes cultural activity. Club members have made outings to theater and ballet, in additionto holding parties.

Critics of the club, however, said comparisonsbetween the Bee and the all-male final clubs areunavoidable.

"As far as I can tell, the activities that theystrive to have and the connections they're makingto me demonstrate that they do try to be a finalclub," said Minna M. Jarvenpaa '93, co-presidentof the Radcliffe Union of Students.

Sources have said that Bee members wish toavoid the fate of the failed Athena Club, whosefounders two years ago issued an open invitationfor all women to join.

Allison K. Hughes '94, who is listed with thestate as club treasure, would not discuss the Bee.

Bryn G. Zeckhauser '93, listed as clerk of theclub, could not be reached for comment last night

Critics of the club, however, said comparisonsbetween the Bee and the all-male final clubs areunavoidable.

"As far as I can tell, the activities that theystrive to have and the connections they're makingto me demonstrate that they do try to be a finalclub," said Minna M. Jarvenpaa '93, co-presidentof the Radcliffe Union of Students.

Sources have said that Bee members wish toavoid the fate of the failed Athena Club, whosefounders two years ago issued an open invitationfor all women to join.

Allison K. Hughes '94, who is listed with thestate as club treasure, would not discuss the Bee.

Bryn G. Zeckhauser '93, listed as clerk of theclub, could not be reached for comment last night

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