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Carson Discusses Success, Ghetto

By William C. Slaughter, Contributing Reporter

Young people growing up in America's inner cities need not feel trapped by their ghetto environment, said Dr. Benjamin S. Carson, a noted neurosurgeon at Johns Hopkins University, in a speech at Emerson Hall yesterday.

Carson, author of Gifted Hands emphasized that individual success in America is largely a matter of personal ambition and dedication, and not of one's environment.

"Success relates tremendously to what a person thinks of himself, and what responsibilities he agrees to take upon himself," said Carson, one of the country's pre-eminent pediatric neurosurgeons.

Carson, a Black man who grew up the child of a single parent family in inner city Detroit, pointed to himself as a prime example of the success a person could achieve.

The speech entitled, "Success is Yours: Make It Happen," was delivered to more than 90 people at the invitation of the Harvard Society of Black Scientists and Engineers.

Focusing in particular on the problems faced by young Black males, Carson said the absence of Black intellectual role models is a major impediment to the escape, education and success of this group.

"Our young people should develop some degree of perspective," Carson said. "When they begin to say "I can be a Dr. J or a Michael Jackson,' is it any wonder that they don't think of themselves as scientists, engineers, or intellectuals in general?"

Carson encouraged students to take control of their own educations,especially in the fields of science andengineering.

He warned that the increasing ignorance ofAmerican students in these areas will make theU.S. "the source to which other nations will turnfor cheap and ignorant labor in the future."

"Education becomes the responsibility not ofthe school, not of the teacher, but of theindividual student." he said.

The neurosurgeon concluded his speech with anappeal to students to keep their educationalhorizons broad.

"There is no knowledge that isn't valuable," hesaid. "You never know when its going to come backto pay you back."

Carson attended Yale as an undergraduate

He warned that the increasing ignorance ofAmerican students in these areas will make theU.S. "the source to which other nations will turnfor cheap and ignorant labor in the future."

"Education becomes the responsibility not ofthe school, not of the teacher, but of theindividual student." he said.

The neurosurgeon concluded his speech with anappeal to students to keep their educationalhorizons broad.

"There is no knowledge that isn't valuable," hesaid. "You never know when its going to come backto pay you back."

Carson attended Yale as an undergraduate

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