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General Counsel Search Down to Short List

Rudenstine Has Four Remaining Candidates; Hopes for Appointment by October 1

By Ira E. Stoll, Crimson Staff Writer

President Neil L. Rudenstine said yesterday he has reached the final stages of his search for a new vice president and general counsel.

The search is down to four finalists. Rudenstine said, adding that he hopes to fill the position by October 1.

University Attorney Frank J. Connors has been acting as the top Harvard lawyer since July 1, when Daniel Steiner '54 retired from the job he had held for 20 years.

The search, Rudenstine said, is "going well." He said he has spoken with the four finalists, but has not offered any of them the job.

Michael W. Roberts secretary of the University and assistant to the president, is managing the search. Roberts called the finalists "a small but diverse group on whom the president is concentrating his attention."

Rudenstine said there is a woman among the four finalists. The group includes some people with experience as university attorneys and others without such experience, he said.

Sources say none of the four final candidates currently works at Harvard.

Roberts said Rudenstine is taking a "hands-on approach" to the search, personally interviewing the top candidates.

The person who eventually fills the position, Roberts said, "has to have the confidence of the President and be able to work intimately with him."

In addition to Roberts, Vice President for Government, Community and Public Affairs John H. Shattuck, himself a lawyer, has helped Rudenstine with the search.

The general counsel has traditionally been a very close adviser to the president.Steiner had an office near the president's on thefirst floor of Mass. Hall, and was instrumental inhelping former president Derek C. Bok deal withstudent protests and prickly ethical questions ontopics like divestment and the CIA.

However, now that Provost Jerry R. Green hasjoined the central administration, the nextgeneral counsel will probably play a smaller rolethan Steiner did.

Rudenstine has said he will rely on all of hisvice presidents equally for advice. Still, hisclient-lawyer relationship with the new generalcounsel is likely to be close.

Gady A. Epstein contributed to the reportingof this story.

However, now that Provost Jerry R. Green hasjoined the central administration, the nextgeneral counsel will probably play a smaller rolethan Steiner did.

Rudenstine has said he will rely on all of hisvice presidents equally for advice. Still, hisclient-lawyer relationship with the new generalcounsel is likely to be close.

Gady A. Epstein contributed to the reportingof this story.

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