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200,000 Arrive for 'Head' Race

By Etan J. Cohen

Rowing fans, tourists and patriots from as far away as Norway lined the banks of the Charles River yesterday for the Head of the Charles regatta, the largest single-day boat race in the world.

According to State Trooper Larry Gillis, the crowd numbered about 200,000. Though this was enough to create lines of 30 people or more at falafel vendors and portable toilets, it fell short of the 250,000 predicted by event organizers.

What drew many was not a love of racing but the sunny weather and a chance to get together with friends.

Ted Liu, a fourth-year student in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, came for the beautiful weather and spent most of his time reading a newspaper. "I came just to see what it was like," Liu said.

And although Calvin and Barbara Pingree of the North Shore attended last year's race, they were awed again by the annual Fall spectacle. "I couldn't believe it," said Mr. Pingree.

Linnette F. Sanders, a Simmons College alumna, came to the race for the first time this year, mostly to relax with friends. "I'm not used to relaxing," she said. "It was very subdued," she said, adding that she had expected more excitement during the race.

Sanders' friend, Hope F. White, a Northeastern University graduate, said she was glad her friend found the afternoon relaxing. "We're teaching [Linette] how to chill." And though White is not a racing fan, she attends the regatta loyally.

"I don't know what the hell is going on," she said. "But I come every year."

Natalie G. Miniutti, a Yale graduate, comes every year, even though her husband is a Harvard alumnus. It has not weakened her school loyalty, Miniutti said. "I root for Yale," she said. "Obviously."

Nina Loenning and Dunn Rostad of Norway came not out of school ties but out of patriotism. "Norway's going to compete," said Rostad, "So we have to watch them."

For Derek Bander of Albany, most of the excitement was happening away from the race. "My car is towed. We don'tknow what's been going on," he said. However, hewas hopeful that the day would pick up. "The dayis young," he said.

One of Bander's friends, however, had a morecolorful assessment of the event. "Three words,"he said, "High school girls!" Asked for his name,the friend disappeared into the crowd ofspectators.

Tim Sullivan attended the races with theColumbia club of New England. "It's a great event.We come every year," he said. For Sullivan, theHead of the Charles presented a unique opportunityto be reunited with old friends. He spotted oneold friend rowing. "His bald head looked the sameas it did 20 years ago."

Joe Child '48 attends the races regularly, butthis was the first year he had ever rowed. "I hada wonderful time," he said, "Even though I rowedbadly."

Denman H. James, a student at Brown Universityand a member of the school's crew team, came toroot for Brown and to see old friends. James saidthe race lived up to all the publicity

One of Bander's friends, however, had a morecolorful assessment of the event. "Three words,"he said, "High school girls!" Asked for his name,the friend disappeared into the crowd ofspectators.

Tim Sullivan attended the races with theColumbia club of New England. "It's a great event.We come every year," he said. For Sullivan, theHead of the Charles presented a unique opportunityto be reunited with old friends. He spotted oneold friend rowing. "His bald head looked the sameas it did 20 years ago."

Joe Child '48 attends the races regularly, butthis was the first year he had ever rowed. "I hada wonderful time," he said, "Even though I rowedbadly."

Denman H. James, a student at Brown Universityand a member of the school's crew team, came toroot for Brown and to see old friends. James saidthe race lived up to all the publicity

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