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Students `Indignant' Over Chem Exam Date

Professor Says He May Reschedule Test

By Etan J. Cohen

For students in Chemistry 30, "Organic Chemistry," Thanksgiving break may be more of a cramming session than a vacation.

Many students are upset because the course's second exam is currently scheduled for 8 a.m. on November 29, the day after Thanksgiving break.

Some students said they have been forced to change their vacation schedules, and one even considered circulating a petition in protest.

But Loeb Professor of Chemistry Yoshito Kishi, one of the course's two lecturers, said in an interview last night he will ask students tomorrow if they want to change the exam date. Kishi said he would change the test date if everyone agreed.

Kishi said that because the exam date and time were set in the syllabus, he did not want to disturb the plans of those who planned according to that schedule. "We have to be fair to everyone," he said.

Some students who were interviewed said they strongly favor changing the test date.

Moupali Das '96 said the exam time will make it hard for students to study in groups and to ask questions. Das, who said she was "indignant," planned to circulate a petition to change the date among students. After class on Monday, she asked students if they would be willing to sign such a petition.

But Das met with Head Tutor James E. Davis later that day, who told her it would be more effective to talk theconflict over with the professors.

"I feel bad about that," said Davis, "but noone really has the authority to [impose on aprofessor]. It has to be a matter of persuasion."

Some students had to change their vacationplans. Logan S. McCarty '96 was planning onreturning home from Buffalo, N.Y., in time for the9 a.m. class. McCarty said he had to change histickets in order to arrive in time for the 8 a.m.exam.

Logan added that if the professors expected thestudents to conform to the schedule, they shouldconform to it themselves.

"True, it is a calendar day," he said. "But ifyou want to be formalistic, the class is at nine."

Noah T. Zinkin '96 also was not satisfied withthe exam time. When asked how the scheduling wouldaffect his weekend, Zinkin said, "WhatThanksgiving weekend? The last few days will beruined."

Kishi was surprised that students were upsetover the matter. "This is very, very confusingnews to me," he said.

Some students, however, said they did notexpect the test to affect their Thanksgivingvacation.

"It's only an exam," Frederick S Soo. '96 said."You're going to rotate your life around an exam?

"I feel bad about that," said Davis, "but noone really has the authority to [impose on aprofessor]. It has to be a matter of persuasion."

Some students had to change their vacationplans. Logan S. McCarty '96 was planning onreturning home from Buffalo, N.Y., in time for the9 a.m. class. McCarty said he had to change histickets in order to arrive in time for the 8 a.m.exam.

Logan added that if the professors expected thestudents to conform to the schedule, they shouldconform to it themselves.

"True, it is a calendar day," he said. "But ifyou want to be formalistic, the class is at nine."

Noah T. Zinkin '96 also was not satisfied withthe exam time. When asked how the scheduling wouldaffect his weekend, Zinkin said, "WhatThanksgiving weekend? The last few days will beruined."

Kishi was surprised that students were upsetover the matter. "This is very, very confusingnews to me," he said.

Some students, however, said they did notexpect the test to affect their Thanksgivingvacation.

"It's only an exam," Frederick S Soo. '96 said."You're going to rotate your life around an exam?

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