News

Harvard Law School Makes Online Zero-L Course Free for All U.S. Law Schools Due to Coronavirus

News

For Kennedy School Fellows, Epstein-Linked Donors Present a Moral Dilemma

News

Tenants Grapple with High Rents and Local Turnover at Asana-Owned Properties

News

In April, Theft Surged as Cambridge Residents Stayed at Home

News

The History of Harvard's Commencement, Explained

HOLA, HUMA Elect New Officers

By Emilie L. Kao

Two Latin American student groups elected new presidents and executive boards this week, and the new leaders of both organizations pledged to bring about greater unity and more events for the approximately 150 Latin American students involved in the two organizations.

Armando Valenzuela, who is studying jointly at the Kennedy School of Government and the Business School, was elected president of the Harvard University Mexican Association (HUMA).

The three-year-old group promotes a better understanding of Mexican society and culture among members of the Harvard community, according to outgoing president Alejandro Ramirez Magana'94.

He said the biggest challenge for the new executive board will be to serve the diverse interests of Mexican students from the College and all nine graduate schools.

"They [the new leaders] want to give continually to ongoing projects, integrating all of the Mexican students from different faculties," Ramirez Magana said. "One innovation will be sports activities between students and another will be monthly round tables and debates."

Ramirez Magana said the debates would discuss issues such as the Mexican political situation or social problems in Mexico.

Ramirez Magana is also the outgoing president and one of the founders of Harvard Organization of Latin America (HOLA). Claudia Llaredo'95 and Andrea M. Flamenco '96 were elected co-presidents for next year at HOLA's Wednesday night meeting.

Llaredo said last night that she has three goals for next year.

"Firstly, we want to unite the people who are Latin American and the people who are interested in Latin America," Llaredo said.

"Secondly, we hope to bring more speakers to Harvard who are interested in Latin America to heighten awareness of Latin American issues here," she said. "Latin America is sometimesignored. There is not as much interest in it as inoften areas.

"Thirdly, we wanted to promote a Latin AmericanStudies department. We feel Harvard should providea much larger faculty and more resources," Llaredosaid. "The certificate [in Latin American Studies]is a good attempt, but our ultimate goal is to geta department established."

Llaredo said that although HOLA and HUMA haveco-sponsored several events, including the visitof 1992 Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchu,HOLA is designed for all who are interested inLatin American issues, while HUMA is specificallyfor Mexican students

"Thirdly, we wanted to promote a Latin AmericanStudies department. We feel Harvard should providea much larger faculty and more resources," Llaredosaid. "The certificate [in Latin American Studies]is a good attempt, but our ultimate goal is to geta department established."

Llaredo said that although HOLA and HUMA haveco-sponsored several events, including the visitof 1992 Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchu,HOLA is designed for all who are interested inLatin American issues, while HUMA is specificallyfor Mexican students

Want to keep up with breaking news? Subscribe to our email newsletter.

Tags