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Indian Art Shown at Dudley

By Victor Chen

Poised, naked human figures illuminated the walls of the Dudley House common room last night.

Jatin Das, the creator of these paintings, which were featured in a slide show at the graduate student center, said the bare figures signified the common nature of all people.

The works of the world-renowned Indian artist and poet were among those displayed at a slide lecture titled, "Visual Art of India."

Das' presentation drew especially strong reactions from natives of India in the audience.

"Some of the ideas that I heard were very, very powerful. As someone who has been out of the country for a long time, some of the things I saw came back to me in memory," said Dilip Phadke, a member of last night's audience.

Das presented not only traditional and contemporary Indian paintings but also murals, architecture and less conventional art forms, such as fans and children's toys.

Another audience member said Das' heritage complemented his ability to interpret Indian art.

"It was interesting to get a perspective of India from someone that's immersed in [its culture]," said Salil S. Pitroda '96. "In India, [art] is something that's much more common to people--he's able to relate to that spirit."

The event, which was sponsored by The Boston Center for International Visitors and the Office of the University. Marshal at Harvard University, attracted about 50 people in celebration of International Visitor Month.

The artist's voice grew passionate as he criticized some aspects of the American art establishment.

In America, Das said, "the curator is God," and precise technique and exposure are valued over the painting itself.

"[In America,] my painting is not important; my resume is," Das said.

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