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Salient E-Mail Acknowledges Money Trouble

By Jonathan A. Lewin

Contradicting their statement Monday that The Harvard Salient's financial situation is normal, a Sunday e-mail message from the publication's president to staffers says the paper is "currently in state of emergency."

The message, labelled "URGENT!!!", states that "initial review of all accounts indicate that if we don't bring in AT LEAST $500 in advertisements, we cannot print the next issue."

The message's author, President Corwyn D. Hopke '96, said Monday that the Salient has "a normal financial situation" and called allegations to the contrary lies spread by "fired" Treasurer Ross Frisbie '96.

Former President Whitney Pidot '96 said that Frisbie is a "disgruntled former employee who was fired" and said The Salient has no financial problems.

When asked about Hopke's message, Pidot said "Number one, I didn't know he was sending that out. Number two, he was just trying to scare the staff."

"Similar empty threat e-mails have been sent out in the past, I believe," Managing Editor William M. Jay '98 said.

But in a February 20 e-mail message to The Salient's eight directors, Hopke wrote that "we are facing a serious financial emergency. After paying [the printer], we will have a negative net worth..."

And Editor Matthew L. Bruce '96 sent a message to five directors last Wednesday, stating "The Salient does have serious problems: The most pressing...are financial."

Early this morning, Hopke said that the messages he had sent had been based on "what Ross had been telling us," and that Frisbie had been incorrect.

He said that he had realized several days ago that The Salient was not in a dire situation and that Frisbie was wrong.

But he sent his "state of emergency" message to the staff Sunday night.

When told his message was sent Sunday, Hopke said he must have realized yesterday.

Yet Pidot said Sunday night The Salient was in no financial danger.

Hopke also wrote in his message that "it is not that we don't want to print if we make less than $500; IT WILL BE ILLEGAL TO PRINT."

Pidot said that Hopke is wrong. It would not be illegal for The Salient to publish an issue.

"You MUST work for the business department in order to have an article printed," Hopke wrote. "There will be NO EXCEPTIONS!!!!!!"

Staffers have been told they must try to sell ads to nine or 10 businesses in order to have an article printed.

Hopke wrote that the $500 minimum had to be raised by staffers; the figure takes into account donations and funding Madison Center for Educational Affairs, he wrote.

Business Manager Colin Kennedy '97 yesterday referred all questions onfinancial matters to Hopke.

Frisbie said Monday the paper may not survivethrough 1996 due to "the loss of discipline andthe financial problems and the staff turnover."

Bruce and Frisbie were asked to resign from TheSalient last week; Managing Editor Stephen L.Manley '97 and Sammy C. Lai '97, former assistantbusiness manager, resigned their positions forpersonal reasons. Faculty advisor Baird Professorof History Richard Pipes also resigned hisposition with the organization, Pidot saidyesterday.

"Pipes resigned because of philosophicaldifferences," Pidot said. "Not financial. Hedisagreed with an editorial written by LisaPearlman ['97]."

Pearlman said yesterday that she had not heardPipes had disagreed with her editorial: "Pipes isnot a significant part of The Salient operation."

"It wasn't a terribly well-written article,"Pidot said. "It didn't give the University duerespect."

Kenan Professor of Government Harvey C.Mansfield Jr. '53 is still The Salient's facultyadvisor, Pidot said.

Pidot said The Salient will continue to existbecause he, other contributors and the MadisonCanter will support it.

"While it is my prerogative to support theSalient, it is not my responsibility to supportthe Salient," said Pidot, who says he has loanedthe organization roughly $1,000.

"The current Salient administration isinterested in minimizing the fiscal burden itplaces on me and other supporters," Pidot said

Frisbie said Monday the paper may not survivethrough 1996 due to "the loss of discipline andthe financial problems and the staff turnover."

Bruce and Frisbie were asked to resign from TheSalient last week; Managing Editor Stephen L.Manley '97 and Sammy C. Lai '97, former assistantbusiness manager, resigned their positions forpersonal reasons. Faculty advisor Baird Professorof History Richard Pipes also resigned hisposition with the organization, Pidot saidyesterday.

"Pipes resigned because of philosophicaldifferences," Pidot said. "Not financial. Hedisagreed with an editorial written by LisaPearlman ['97]."

Pearlman said yesterday that she had not heardPipes had disagreed with her editorial: "Pipes isnot a significant part of The Salient operation."

"It wasn't a terribly well-written article,"Pidot said. "It didn't give the University duerespect."

Kenan Professor of Government Harvey C.Mansfield Jr. '53 is still The Salient's facultyadvisor, Pidot said.

Pidot said The Salient will continue to existbecause he, other contributors and the MadisonCanter will support it.

"While it is my prerogative to support theSalient, it is not my responsibility to supportthe Salient," said Pidot, who says he has loanedthe organization roughly $1,000.

"The current Salient administration isinterested in minimizing the fiscal burden itplaces on me and other supporters," Pidot said

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