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Committee Recognizes Student Groups

By Victoria E.M. Cain

The Committee on House Life (COHL) and the Committee on College Life (COCL) granted official approval to several student organizations yesterday afternoon.

Over cookies and Orangina, about 30 administrators, Undergraduate Council members and house affiliates discussed student proposals and complaints in the Dudley House Senior Common Room.

"I think the meeting went very well," said Randall A. Fine '96, chair of the council's Student Affairs Committee. "We appreciate their willingness to let the concerns of students come before the committee."

In a significant departure from past practice, students had set both the agenda and the time for this month's COHL/COCL meeting.

Council representatives say that this procedural change permits a higher level of student participation and more discussion of current student issues.

"I think it's definitely a favorable step for the Undergraduate Council and for students," said Elizabeth A. Haynes '98, vice-chair of the Student Affairs Committee. "The committee is being a lot more receptive to student concerns."

Twelve student groups were recognized by the committee, many of which had waited for recognition since lastfall, but were held up in the turmoil over whetherto grant recognition to Harvard Christians inAction.

The groups sanctioned yesterday includeAsian-American Christian Fellowship; "Diversityand Distinction," a magazine addressing issuesaffecting minority students at Harvard;Observatory Theatre, and offshoot of theHarvard-Radcliffe Dramatic Club dedicated to comicskits, plays and jokes; and the Arnold CulturalSociety, which hopes to "further the admiration ofreal-life giant Arnold Schwarzenegger."

In a related topic, Fine raised questions aboutthe affiliation of campus groups with outsideorganizations.

Dean of the College L. Fred Jewett '57responded that campus group relations withnational organizations were sanctioned, as long asthe Harvard groups retained their autonomy fromthe larger organizations.

Participants also discussed concerns rangingfrom shuttle bus service to morning delivery ofnewspapers, but, with the exception of recognizingnew student groups, few actual decisions weremade. Instead, participants tabled issues untilthe next meeting or referred them tosubcommittees.

Dean of Students Archie C. Epps III didannounce one definitive change--house masters haverevised the College's alcohol policy.

"Now, up to three houses will be able tosponsor events at which alcohol is served," saidEpps. Prior to this year, functions involvingalcohol could be sponsored by only one house andpublicized solely within that house.

UC member N. Van Taylor '95-'96 wasenthusiastic about the change in policy. "It'ssome real progress to try and improve the sociallife at Harvard. We asked them for twelve housesand they gave us three...so we pretty much gotwhat we wanted," he said.

The more volatile issues of shuttle service,newspaper delivery and student concerns aboutbicycles were discussed but eventually directed tosubcommittees, to be dealt with at a latermeeting

The groups sanctioned yesterday includeAsian-American Christian Fellowship; "Diversityand Distinction," a magazine addressing issuesaffecting minority students at Harvard;Observatory Theatre, and offshoot of theHarvard-Radcliffe Dramatic Club dedicated to comicskits, plays and jokes; and the Arnold CulturalSociety, which hopes to "further the admiration ofreal-life giant Arnold Schwarzenegger."

In a related topic, Fine raised questions aboutthe affiliation of campus groups with outsideorganizations.

Dean of the College L. Fred Jewett '57responded that campus group relations withnational organizations were sanctioned, as long asthe Harvard groups retained their autonomy fromthe larger organizations.

Participants also discussed concerns rangingfrom shuttle bus service to morning delivery ofnewspapers, but, with the exception of recognizingnew student groups, few actual decisions weremade. Instead, participants tabled issues untilthe next meeting or referred them tosubcommittees.

Dean of Students Archie C. Epps III didannounce one definitive change--house masters haverevised the College's alcohol policy.

"Now, up to three houses will be able tosponsor events at which alcohol is served," saidEpps. Prior to this year, functions involvingalcohol could be sponsored by only one house andpublicized solely within that house.

UC member N. Van Taylor '95-'96 wasenthusiastic about the change in policy. "It'ssome real progress to try and improve the sociallife at Harvard. We asked them for twelve housesand they gave us three...so we pretty much gotwhat we wanted," he said.

The more volatile issues of shuttle service,newspaper delivery and student concerns aboutbicycles were discussed but eventually directed tosubcommittees, to be dealt with at a latermeeting

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