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Officials Discuss Harvard's Future

By Jonathan N. Axelrod

A crowd of more than 200 gathered in Sanders Theatre yesterday afternoon for a panel discussion, "Harvard Today and Tomorrow," featuring University officials and administrators.

The panel, which was a 50th reunion symposium, featured reunion participants and Corporation members Robert G. Stone Jr. '45 and Charles P. Slichter '45 as well as Provost Albert Carnesale and retiring Dean of the College L. Fred Jewett '57.

The panel was moderated by Robert D. Cross '45, former president of Swarthmore and professor emeritus at the University of Virginia.

Each speaker spoke for about 15 minutes and discussed different aspects of the changes that have occurred at the University and the challenges for the future.

Stone began with a comparison of the changes in both size and scope in terms of students, budget, and staff which have occurred since 1945.

Stone, who is co-chair of the $2.1 billion University Campaign, could not resist acting the part and pointed out that though the University's endowment is the largest in the nation, it ranks seventh per student.

He noted the dramatic increase in the amount of financial aid the college gives, up from $308,000 in 1945 to $118,867,000 today and the cost per capita per day of operation, up to $175 from only $6.

Carnesale began with a story from shortly after he was named provost, when he looked up the office's definition in a dictionary:

"The first said a 'university administrator of high rank'--flattering but not helpful. The second said 'the highest official in a cathedral,' and the third said 'the keeper of a prison,'" Carnesale said. "Now that was getting closer."

He went on to describe the major goals of theUniversity that had been established afterRudenstine's arrival: "to maintain excellence...toattain the resources necessary to do so...[and] todraw the University together."

Carnesale spent most of the remainder of histime discussing the efforts to bring theUniversity together including the fund-drive, thenew five inter-faculty initiatives and the newcentral administrative budget committee.

Slichter spoke on the changes in theUniversity's focus over the years.

He emphasized the increased presence of womenand their acceptance at all of the University'sschool today. And he particularly focused on theMedical School which this year celebrates its 50thyear of accepting women.

Slichter did note, however, that though theirnumbers have been increasing, women are still aminority at the prestigious graduateschools--Medical, Law, Business and GraduateSchool of Arts and Sciences--and that certainconcentrations--like his own of physics--stillhave far to go.

"We still don't seem to be able to teachphysics in a way that connects to women," he said.

Jewett concluded the speeches by discussing theincreased diversity of all kinds at the College:geographic, economic, sexual and racial.

Though no one on the panel directly mentionedthe tragic murder-suicide of last week, Jewettalluded to it in his remarks by saying that therewas a need for improved advising efforts forforeign students.

"We've had to provide mentoring for students,so talented students who come from all differentbackgrounds and countries can contribute," hesaid. "We still have things to learn."

In the question and answer session followingthe individual presentations, alumni took theopportunity to discuss their various concerns.

The first, echoing a concern often heard today,asked if faculty-student interaction hadincreased. The moderator added to the question,asking what incentives there were for teachingsmall groups of students.

Although none of the panelists directlyaddressed the question, Jewett said that"virtually all" professors teach under-graduatesand that interaction was greater than in thefifties. But the only answer that either he orCarnesale provided was that teaching wasconsidered when tenure and reviews were given.

In a touching moment, one graduate recounted astory where he asked a professor if it was reallytrue that today's students were better andbrighter than those from years past.

The professor responded that they were brightbut that the "best there ever were the GIs whoreturned from World War II." The story caused theaudience to break into applause

He went on to describe the major goals of theUniversity that had been established afterRudenstine's arrival: "to maintain excellence...toattain the resources necessary to do so...[and] todraw the University together."

Carnesale spent most of the remainder of histime discussing the efforts to bring theUniversity together including the fund-drive, thenew five inter-faculty initiatives and the newcentral administrative budget committee.

Slichter spoke on the changes in theUniversity's focus over the years.

He emphasized the increased presence of womenand their acceptance at all of the University'sschool today. And he particularly focused on theMedical School which this year celebrates its 50thyear of accepting women.

Slichter did note, however, that though theirnumbers have been increasing, women are still aminority at the prestigious graduateschools--Medical, Law, Business and GraduateSchool of Arts and Sciences--and that certainconcentrations--like his own of physics--stillhave far to go.

"We still don't seem to be able to teachphysics in a way that connects to women," he said.

Jewett concluded the speeches by discussing theincreased diversity of all kinds at the College:geographic, economic, sexual and racial.

Though no one on the panel directly mentionedthe tragic murder-suicide of last week, Jewettalluded to it in his remarks by saying that therewas a need for improved advising efforts forforeign students.

"We've had to provide mentoring for students,so talented students who come from all differentbackgrounds and countries can contribute," hesaid. "We still have things to learn."

In the question and answer session followingthe individual presentations, alumni took theopportunity to discuss their various concerns.

The first, echoing a concern often heard today,asked if faculty-student interaction hadincreased. The moderator added to the question,asking what incentives there were for teachingsmall groups of students.

Although none of the panelists directlyaddressed the question, Jewett said that"virtually all" professors teach under-graduatesand that interaction was greater than in thefifties. But the only answer that either he orCarnesale provided was that teaching wasconsidered when tenure and reviews were given.

In a touching moment, one graduate recounted astory where he asked a professor if it was reallytrue that today's students were better andbrighter than those from years past.

The professor responded that they were brightbut that the "best there ever were the GIs whoreturned from World War II." The story caused theaudience to break into applause

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