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Prof. Jaffe Will Head Math Group

By The CRIMSON Staff

Clay Professor of Mathematics and Theoretical Science Arthur Jaffe, a noted researcher in the field of quantum theory, gauge theory and other areas at the interface of math and physics, has been elected to serve as president of the American Mathematical Society.

Jaffe will serve for one year as president-elect starting February 1, 1996, and then as president during 1997 and 1998. He will replace Cathleen S. Morawetz, a mathematician at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at New York University.

"1995 was a banner year for mathematics, with major mathematical progress made in many areas," Jaffe said in a statement.

While he said he believes the field to be "fundamentally healthy," Jaffe cautioned that there are many areas for concern, including declining funds for research and a shortage of teaching jobs.

"The AMS must address this situation by taking a leadership role in increasing recognition of mathematics and communicating its value, excitement and vigor to the general public, to members of Congress and to fundraising agencies," he said.

Jaffe, who is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, pointed to the revolution in electronic publishing as an area in which he said the AMS can play an important role.

Founded in 1888 to further mathematical research and scholarship, the 30,000-member AMS funds a number of programs and services.

The organization uses its funds to promote mathematical research and its uses, works to strengthen mathematical education and fosters awareness and appreciation of mathematics and its connections to other disciplines and everyday life

"1995 was a banner year for mathematics, with major mathematical progress made in many areas," Jaffe said in a statement.

While he said he believes the field to be "fundamentally healthy," Jaffe cautioned that there are many areas for concern, including declining funds for research and a shortage of teaching jobs.

"The AMS must address this situation by taking a leadership role in increasing recognition of mathematics and communicating its value, excitement and vigor to the general public, to members of Congress and to fundraising agencies," he said.

Jaffe, who is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, pointed to the revolution in electronic publishing as an area in which he said the AMS can play an important role.

Founded in 1888 to further mathematical research and scholarship, the 30,000-member AMS funds a number of programs and services.

The organization uses its funds to promote mathematical research and its uses, works to strengthen mathematical education and fosters awareness and appreciation of mathematics and its connections to other disciplines and everyday life

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