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'Ec 10' Tops Chart Of Largest Classes

By Anne C. Krendl

The nail-biting finish never materialized this year.

Unlike last year, when Social Analysis 10: "Principles of Economics" beat out Literature and Arts C-37: "The Bible and Its Interpreters" for the biggest class by a mere 11 students, Ec10 was clearly the winner this year.

It took the top spot with an enrollment of 964 students, according to statistics released yesterday by the Office of the Registrar.

The next most populous course was Science B-29: "Human Behavioral Biology," with an enrollment of 488 students, although the number was held down by a lottery limiting the class to 500 people.

"Sex," as the class is known, increased its enrollment by almost 100 students, after having 396 last year.

Ben R. Harder '99, a student in Science B-29, said he is taking the class because he is interested in the material.

"I took it largely because I am considering being a bio-anthro major and it's a [pre-requisite] for some of the classes," Harder said. "I have actually already taken a Science B, so it's just an elective."

Following Science B-29 is a class being offered for only the second time.

Literature and Arts B-51: "First Nights: Five Performance Premieres" was the third most popular class, with 433-students. According to Professor of Music Thomas F. Kelly, his course had about 250 students last year.

"This term we had a great many students turn out," Kelly said. "I am very happy about it."

So many students showed up, in fact, that Kelly was forced to hold a lottery for his class.

Moral Reasoning 40, "Confucian Humanism," was next on the list, with 353 students.

Stuart Chandler, the head TF for the course, said the enrollment is down from 500 students two years ago. At that time, Chandler said, there was a rumor circulating that the course was not going to be offered again.

In previous years, about 200 students have enrolled in the class, Chandler said. He added that the wide swing in numbers made it difficult to predict the turnout this year.

"We actually had no idea what the enrollment was going to be because it fluctuated so many times," Chandler said.

The fifth most popular class was also the only non-Core course to crack the top five. Chemistry 7: "Principles of Chemistry" had 326 students.

Another science class was sixth on the list, and many gave credit for high enrollment to its popular professor. Big Classes Top Ten Classes at Harvard This Semester Luke Z. Fenchel Crimson Course Title  Enrollment Social Analysis 10  964 Science B-29  488 Lit. & Arts B-51  433 Moral Reasoning 40  353 Chemistry 7  326 Science A-35  320 Chemistry 27  307 Biological Sciences 1  294 Foreign Cultures 40  293 Philosophy 192  290 Source: Office of the Registrar

Robert P. Kirshner '70, frequently referred to as the David Letterman of the Core, teaches Science A-35: "Matter in the Universe," which had an enrollment of 320 students.

Kirshner said he is pleased with the turnout, even though he is unsure about the reason behind the popularity for the course.

"The thing that is scary about teaching a big course is you worry about why it is popular," Kirshner said.

The next three classes were Chemistry 27: "Organic Chemistry of Life," with 307 students; Biological Sciences 1: "Introductory Genetics, Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology," with 294 students; and Foreign Cultures 40, "The Cultural Legacy of the Ancient Near East," with 293 students.

Finally, a tie for the tenth spot featured two classes which each had an enrollment of 290 students.

Philosophy 192: "Thinking About Thinking," taught by Porter Professor of Philosophy Robert Nozick, Frank-furter Professor of Law Alan M. Dershowitz and Agassiz Professor of Zoology Stephen J. Gould, tied with Historical Study B-46: "The Darwinian Revolution," taught by Professor of the History of Science Everett I. Mendelsohn, for the final spot

Robert P. Kirshner '70, frequently referred to as the David Letterman of the Core, teaches Science A-35: "Matter in the Universe," which had an enrollment of 320 students.

Kirshner said he is pleased with the turnout, even though he is unsure about the reason behind the popularity for the course.

"The thing that is scary about teaching a big course is you worry about why it is popular," Kirshner said.

The next three classes were Chemistry 27: "Organic Chemistry of Life," with 307 students; Biological Sciences 1: "Introductory Genetics, Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology," with 294 students; and Foreign Cultures 40, "The Cultural Legacy of the Ancient Near East," with 293 students.

Finally, a tie for the tenth spot featured two classes which each had an enrollment of 290 students.

Philosophy 192: "Thinking About Thinking," taught by Porter Professor of Philosophy Robert Nozick, Frank-furter Professor of Law Alan M. Dershowitz and Agassiz Professor of Zoology Stephen J. Gould, tied with Historical Study B-46: "The Darwinian Revolution," taught by Professor of the History of Science Everett I. Mendelsohn, for the final spot

Finally, a tie for the tenth spot featured two classes which each had an enrollment of 290 students.

Philosophy 192: "Thinking About Thinking," taught by Porter Professor of Philosophy Robert Nozick, Frank-furter Professor of Law Alan M. Dershowitz and Agassiz Professor of Zoology Stephen J. Gould, tied with Historical Study B-46: "The Darwinian Revolution," taught by Professor of the History of Science Everett I. Mendelsohn, for the final spot

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