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Dissident Asks U.S. to Sanction China

Wu Warns of Rising Economic Strength

By Connie Chang

Prominent Chinese human rights advocate Harry Wu called for America to re-examine its China policy in a speech at Wadsworth House yesterday.

Wu said the United State's economic policies can have a major impact on human rights in China.

"I think the United States needs a real, real China policy," Wu said, calling on America to "deliver a message to the Chinese Communist government" that there is "no free lunch."

Wu likened the Chinese government to a building, saying the exterior of the building looks better today than ever before because of economic growth.

But Wu warned that "most of the posts are already damaged and the structure will collapse in a few decades."

Wu said he would go to China again if he were allowed to enter and leave the country freely.

"Of course I will go [to China] again," Wu said. "China belongs to the people. I am one of the people. China does not belong to the Communists."

After a brief rest, Wu attended a reception held in the Quincy House Junior Common Room.

Jack S. Vaitayanonta, a senior from Dartmouth College who is attending this weekend's Asian American Intercollegiate Conference, said he was excited to meet Wu.

"I think it's amazing to see someone about whom I heard so much be able to come to Harvard," Vaitayanonta said. "It's great to see that he believes that college students are critical in the advancement of human rights in China."

Wu was confined to 12 different camps in China over 19 years for his vocal protests against the Chinese government.

Wu was arrested last June while attempting to legally visit China. After a four hour trial in July, he was sentenced to 15 years in prison for treason.

Due to overwhelming international pressure, he was released by the Chinese government and returned to the United States on Aug. 24.

Wu continues to labor as an advocate for human rights and freedom as the executive director of the non-profit Langoi Research Foundation which is devoted to documenting the conditions of China's work-camps.

The Harvard Foundation for Intercultural and Race Relations, which partially sponsored Wu's visit, presented the activist with a Foundation Award for his efforts to expose China's human rights violations.

The Harvard Asian American Association and Quincy House also sponsored Wu's visit

Wu was confined to 12 different camps in China over 19 years for his vocal protests against the Chinese government.

Wu was arrested last June while attempting to legally visit China. After a four hour trial in July, he was sentenced to 15 years in prison for treason.

Due to overwhelming international pressure, he was released by the Chinese government and returned to the United States on Aug. 24.

Wu continues to labor as an advocate for human rights and freedom as the executive director of the non-profit Langoi Research Foundation which is devoted to documenting the conditions of China's work-camps.

The Harvard Foundation for Intercultural and Race Relations, which partially sponsored Wu's visit, presented the activist with a Foundation Award for his efforts to expose China's human rights violations.

The Harvard Asian American Association and Quincy House also sponsored Wu's visit

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